Archive for the ‘Society news’ Category


Two Pretty Weddings

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The Lehigh Valley Argus: Oct. 26, 1906

Two Pretty Weddings

Mr. Hay and Miss Russell; Mr. McAnally and Miss Daniels

Both Weddings Held Wednesday.

The marriage of Miss Letitia Maud Russell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Russell of this place, and Mr. Archie Hay, of Coalville, occurred at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Sam Reynolds, at high noon, on Wednesday, October 24th, 1906, Rev. H.C. Nissen of the M.E. church officiating. Only the relatives of the contracting parties attended the wedding. The bride was attired in a becoming gown of cream henrietta, trimmed in lace and silk applique and looked very handsome. The wedding march was played by the bride’s sister, Miss Ethel, while the happy couple took their places where solemn vows which made them man and wife were spoken. They were attended by the bride’s sister Miss Maggie Russell and Mr. Wm. Jordison. After the ceremony the company sat down to a bountiful wedding dinner.

The bride is well and favorably known in Lehigh and vicinity. Until recently she was one of the efficient “hello” girls of the Lehigh Telephone company in which capacity she has been employed during the past three years. She is a popular young lady holding the highest esteem of all acquaintances and friends, and is endowed with those womanly traits of character which make her loved and respected by all.
The groom is an industrious young man and is held in high esteem by those who know him well. This popular young couple will go to keeping house at Coalville, where the groom has prepared a home. The best wishes of a host of friends for a happy married life is given the happy couple.

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The marriage of Miss Mollie Agusta Daniels, daughter of Mrs. W.H. Daniels, to Mr. Earl Baker McAnally, both of this place, occurred at the home of the bride’s mother on Wednesday evening, October 24th, 1906, Rev. H. C. Nissen of the M.E. church officiating. About sixty invited guests were present and the wedding was a very pretty affair. The house was prettily decorated with autumn foliage. The bride was attired in a beautiful gown of white silk. The happy couple was attended by Miss Maria Elsberry and Mr. James McAnally. Lohengrin’s wedding march was played by Mr. N.H. Tyson as the young couple took their place before the assembled guests. After the ceremony had been performed and congratulations had been given the happy couple, all sat down to an elaborate wedding supper of eight courses.

The bride is a member of one of Webster county’s prosperous and highly respected families and has a large circle of close friends. The groom is an industrious and thrifty young man who also has a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Both are popular Lehigh young people who are beginning their journey together in the brightest of life’s mornings. They have gone to keeping house at the home of the bride’s mother where they will remain this winter.

The Argus joins with the many friends of both couples in wishing them a happy and contented married life.

(Editor’s note: I find the differences in the descriptions of the two weddings to be interesting. You can tell the different social and economic statuses of the two couples even before being told that the second bride’s family is prosperous, just by the descriptions of the wedding dresses and wedding suppers, the number of guests at each wedding, and the fact that Leticia Russell worked before she was married.)

Saturday Evening Post: Oct. 21, 1893

Life’s Eventful Drama

Touches of Tragedy and Chunks of Comedy to the Passing Play on the World’s Great Stage of Human Action.

The Players’ Entrances and Exits.

A Faithful Reproduction of Seven Days’ Scenes And Incidents in Local Life in Which We all Are Actors.

The “Midway Plaisance,” the name under which the social at the armory was given last Wednesday evening, was by no means a misnomer, for the hall was decorated, adorned and populated as one who had never seen the original Midway would imagine it might look. Booths attended by charming maidens adorned in various oriental costumes were scattered about over the large hall and the wares they handled went like red lemonade at a circus. The novelty of the name was the means of drawing a large crowd, and the result was a neat sum secured to the society, for whose benefit it was given.

A man who had been fleecing the counties of Kussuth (sic) and Humboldt with wolf skins, claimed to have been killed in these counties, and who had already worked Webster county for $35 in the same manner, was arrested here Wednesday while trying to work Auditor Cunningham for bounty on three more skins. He was taken to Kossuth county for prosecution.

Judge Hyatt granted an injunction this week restraining the county auditor from entering Rosanna Arnold’s property upon the tax book for guttering and curbing assessments. The description is lots 7 and 9 block 16 and the amount assessed was $441.00 (about $11,734 today). The property owner claims damage to the property by the grading that was done.

The Swedish Grieg Mandskor went to Badger last Tuesday to give one of their musical entertainments there for the benefit of the Norwegian Lutheran church. This organization is a very strong one, the chorus consisting of nearly twenty voices.

The committee on bridges let the contract last Tuesday for repairing the Lehigh bridge. Bids were as follows: J. Daniels & Co., $380; O.H. Larson, $447; C.T. Gustafson, $565; J.T. O’Connor, $595. The contract was given to Daniels & Co., who reside at Lehigh.

It appears that the prohibitionists of Webster county have reconsidered their endorsement of C.W. Newton for county treasurer and placed upon their ticket Mr. D.K. Lincoln instead. This is the way the ticket is filed with the county auditor.

The university of Iowa foot ball team got beautifully wallopped (sic) by the Denver atheletic (sic) club team in Denver last Saturday. The score stood 58 to 0. Should think the boys would be ashamed to come home.

Mrs. Jacob Mericle, of Holiday creek, one of Webster County’s pioneer settlers, died at her home last Wednesday, aged 72 years. She leaves a husband and a large family of children to mourn her loss.

A man in Meadville, Pa., has invented a barometer which not only indicates the weather in advance, but will sound a continuous alarm before the approach of cyclones and other death dealing storms.

The ladies of the Presbyterian church gave a most enjoyable social at the Armory last Friday evening. A large crowd was highly entertained by the very excellent musical program provided by the ladies.

John Koll has broken ground for a two story brick building, 22×30, on First avenue south, adjoining O.M. Oleson’s warehouse. Mr. Oleson will begin in a few days to veneer his with brick.

M.F. Byrne and Miss Kate McClarney were married at the home of the bride’s mother in this city Wednesday morning. The young couple left for Chicago on a wedding trip.

Four new recruits for the U.S. army have been secured in this city, as follows: S.A. Brown, Will H. Brown, Robert Curliss and Roscoe King. They all enlist for three years.

The vault door of the American Express company was closed a couple days this week, because the combination would not work. It had to be drilled open.

A. W. Braley has resigned his position with the Mason City Times and was spending a few days calling upon Fort Dodge friends the first of the week.


Local News

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Jan. 4, 1915

Local News

Annual Meeting

The annual meeting and banquet of the Plymouth Clay Products Company will take place Tuesday evening. The traveling men and stockholders are arriving in the city today, and all will be here for tomorrow.

Changes Position

Lou Brunenkant has resigned his position with the Strow Cigar Company and has taken one with Robert Wilson at the Conway Cigar Store. Brunenkant worked in his present position when the Conway Company had the place.

In New Position

Mrs. J.M. Spayde has resigned her position at the Cozy Tea Rooms and accepted one at the Drapery Shop.

Winter in California

Mr. and Mrs. A.S.R. Reynolds leave the last of the week for California where they will spend the winter.

Small Fire Today

The fire department were called about 2:00 p.m. today to the home of F.P. Schultz, 1504 Fifth avenue north. Whent he department arrived a small fire was discovered in the basement of the house. It is thought some rubbish which was piled near the furnace caught fire from the furnace causing the people to call the fire department. The fire was easily extinguished and practically no damage was done.

Purse Snatcher at Work

A home on First avenue north was entered precipitately Saturday evening about 9:30 by Miss Sarah Gallagher, who was badly frightened by a recent encounter with a purse snatcher. She explained that she had been walking between Central avenue and First avenue north when a man ran paster her and snatched at her purse. The purse handle broke, the purse fell to the ground and the man did not turn back to get it, but disappeared down an alley, running west. Miss Gallagher recovered her purse, which she said contained about fifty dollars (about $1,135 today).


Wedding in Gowrie

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The Gowrie News: Jan. 1, 1891


On Sunday Evening last, Dec. 28, at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Smith, in Gowrie, occured [sic] the marriage of Miss Minnie Smith to Mr. Charles Patterson, all of Gowrie. Prompt at 7 o’clock the bridesmaid and groomsman marched into the parlor followed by the bride and groom who took their place at the west part of the room, and Rev. D.G. Youker pronounced the ceremony, w hich was followed by congratulation of their friends. The guests were then invited to partake of a delicious supper which had been prepared for the occasion by Mrs. Smith. After spending a few hours very pleasantly together the guests departed for home and the newly married couple went to his home west of town. The News extends congratulation [sic].

List of presents

Set of glassware — Misses Martha Fawver and Iona Connett.
Pair of fine linen towels  —  Mrs. Magnusson and son, Master Chas.
Parlor lamp — Messrs. John and Chas. Marshall
Pair of beautiful gilt vases —

(Editor’s note: The article does leave off as shown here.)

The Fort Dodge Messenger: June 8, 2903

Local Ins and Outs

Miss Josie O’Hara spent Sunday in Eagle Grove.

Thomas Nixson is home for his summer vacation.

Fred Hall, of Sioux City, is visiting relatives in the city.

Miss Ida Oleson left Saturday morning for a visit in Boone.

Miss Amy Dyke of Colorado Springs is visiting in this city.

Mrs. Otis Garrison of Sioux City, is visiting Fort Dodge friends.

James Delamore and U. Graham of Clare were in the city Saturday.

Miss Evelyn Rodney of Independence is visiting at the M.J. Rodney home.

E.G. Larson and Dr. C.J. Saunders went to Clare this afternoon to attend a bank meeting.

County Superintendent A.L. Brown and wife visited over Sunday with relatives in Sac City.

Mrs. D.J. Farrell has returned to her home in Mason City after a visit at the Dr. Farrell home.

Dick Kenyon has returned from Grinnell where he has spent the year in the pursuit of learning in Iowa college.

Miss Maude Herrick leaves tonight for her home in Elk River, Minn., where she will spend most of the summer.

E.S. Tinkham was called to Humboldt on Friday by news of illness of his father, returning to the city Saturday.

Miss Maude Herrick leaves tonight for her home in Elk River, Minn., where she will spend most of the summer. (Editor’s note: This was repeated in the original paper.)

Will Mulroney has returned to the city for a week’s vacation after a trip on the road in the interest of the Gate City Hat Company.

Miss Gertrude Gardner has returned from Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, where she has held a position in the art department of the schools.

Miss Ella Beach, of Minneapolis, who has been visiting her mother and father in the city, leaves this week for Seattle, Washington.

Dr. C.J. Saunders leaves on Tuesday for Rochester, Minn. He expects to spend several days in studying in a hospital which is located there.

Thomas Kozel who has been living in Arizona for the past two years is expected home in a few days, for a visit with relatives in Fort Dodge.

After a visit at the J.W. Beck home in this city, Mrs. A.J. Hanson has returned to her home in Thor. She was accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Beck.

Mrs. Augusta Hill has gone to Grinnell to attend the commencement exercises of Iowa college, from which her daughter, Miss Ina Hill, graduates this year.


Absence Made Her Love Grow Cold

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Sept. 1, 1903

Absence Made Her Love Grow Cold

Miss Gilday’s Romance of an Egg Proves That “Absence” is Not an Axiom

Marries Him Who Stayed Home

Fort Dodge Girls Who Wrote Name on Egg Shipped to Cuba, Weds Oct. 28

Des Moines, Iowa, September 1 — It was during the Spanish-American war in 1898 that Miss Marie Gilday of Fort Dodge, Iowa, mischievously scrawled her name over the white shell of an egg and slipped it into a packing case at the plant of a big Fort Dodge packing establishment. She was surprised a month later when she received a letter postmarked Santiago, Cuba. The egg had been part of a consignment to the American soldiers in Cuba and Corporal Percy Smith found it in the case when he was working in the commissary department. He wrote to Miss Gilday in Iowa it was not long before he received a reply. Letters flew thick and fast between them and an exchange of pictures followed. Then rumor had it that they were engaged and that Smith was to be furloughed so he could come and visit her.

Fay Cronlin, telegraph operator at the Illinois Central station met Miss Gilday in Fort Dodge the same year. He saw and loved her. But the story of the girl’s strange betrothal to the soldier came to him and he refrained from speaking the words that were in his heart. His companionship continued, but ont (sic – should be not) his courtship. The soldier boy in Santiago who wrote that he was coming to visit Miss Gilday, could not get the furlough and he wrote that he would have to wait until he was discharged from the army.

Seeing the operator every day apparently had its effect on Miss Gilday’s affections. A short time ago she wrote to the soldier telling him their correspondence must cease. When she told this to Cronlin he proposed. The result was that Miss Gilday resigned her position Wednesday and left for Council Bluffs to visit at Cronlin’s home. Yesterday, the wedding invitations were sent out. The marriage will take place at the home of Miss Gilday’s mother October 28. Mr. and Mrs. Cronlin will live in Sioux City.

(Editor’s note: I did a quick search on and discovered in the “Iowa, Marriages, 1809-1992” that Marie Gilday is listed as mother of the bride in the marriage of Dorothy E. Cronland to Earl E. Walters. The father of the bride is listed as Fayette J. Cronland. The marriage took place on Nov. 24, 1924, in Council Bluffs. A search for Fay Cronland brought up the actual marriage in the “Iowa, County Marriages, 1838-1934” records. It did take place on Oct. 28, 1903, in Fort Dodge. But the bride’s name is listed as Elizabeth Gilday.)


Freak Marriage of Stratford Girl

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 27, 1904

Freak Marriage of Stratford Girl

Wedded at Spiritualist Camp Meeting Before Crowd of Spectators

Minerva Bentley is the Bride

Weds William L. Gibbs of Abilene, Tex., Met at Camp Meeting at Cedar Rapids, and Concluded to be Made One on the Spot

Stratford, Ia. Aug. 27 — Miss Minerva Bentley of Stratford took an important part in a woods wedding at Cedar Rapids on Wednesday evening. In fact, she was the bride, the groom being William L. Gibbs of Abilene, Tex. The two were attending the Spiritualists’ camp meeting there and concluded to enter into matrimony before the close of the camp meeting. The following is a report from the meeting in regard to this strange wedding:

“There is a little matter of business to transact before we conclude,” solemnly observed a minister at the Spiritualists’ camp meeting at Cedar River Park last evening: and with the audience all in ignorance of what was to transpire a blushing bride and groom walked into full view of the crowd and proceeded to answer the usual questions incident to a marriage ceremony.

The couple who chose this novel and surprising method of becoming man and wife were William L. Gibbs of Abilene, Tex., and Minerva Bentley of Stratford, Ia. They have been in attendance at the camp meeting and arranged with Rev. J. Allord to make a preliminary announcement and perform the ceremony.

(Editor’s note: I looked up the marriage on They were married on Aug. 24, 1904, — a Wednesday, as mentioned in the article — in Waterloo. She was 44 and he was 53. His parents were John L. Gibbs and Martha J. Long. Her parents were William Bowman and Maria Hardin.)


Gets a Wife Through an “Ad”

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 22, 1905

Gets a Wife Through an “Ad”

Iowa Man Chooses a Unique Method of Securing a Helpmeet

Webster City, Ia. Aug. 22 — Bert Owen, a young machinist from Valley Junction, has been in Webster City for several days in search of a wife. He advertised in the want ad column of one of the state papers for a helpmeet and a Hamilton county girl answered the advertisement. Owen returned home this morning in a very happy frame of mind and announced to close friends here that the wedding would take place during the week of the state fair.

Just who the fair damsel is is still something of a secret. Owen announced that her home is in Stanhope, but that she is visiting relatives in Webster City, and that she answered his advertisement form this city. Owen refused to disclose her name, but talked freely of his brief but successful romance.

He came to the city several days ago registered at the Wilson hotel and sought out the lady who had answered the advertisement. “She had sent me her photo,” said he at the depot this morning, “and I liked her looks. But say, she’s a whole lot better looking than the picture and I’m just sure we will like each other.”

Owen is quite talkative. Upon his arrival here he visited several stores in the city and sought information from the clerks as to the woman who had answer (sic) his advertisement. He was not at all backward and confided to all that she had answered his matrimonial advertisement and that he had come to the city to look her up. Since she is from Stanhope, south of the city, not many knew her. Owen, however, was not disheartened by this and apparently the investigations he carried on were satisfactory to him for the brief acquaintance of only a few days will culminate at the marriage altar.


Double Wedding

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: May 15, 1906

Double Wedding

Miss Clara Proeschold and Mr. Henry Scharfenberg and Miss Berth Scharfenberg and Mr. D. Powell

A double wedding will take place on Wednesday of this week when Miss Bertha Scharfenberg and Mr. Daniel Powell and Mr. Henry Scharfenberg and Miss Clara Proeschold will be married. The young people have been very reticent about the affair and have given no clue as to the time of day or the place. It is thought that the wedding ceremoies (sic) will be performed at the home of the latter couple on Round Prairie.

Both young ladies are well known in Fort Dodge, where they have resided several years. The grooms are both very popular here. Mr. Powell, lately of Ohio, is a canvassing photographer. He and his bride will start on a trip immediately after the ceremony. Mr. Scharfenberg is employed at the Fort Dodge Planing mill, where he has a splendid position.



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The Fort Dodge Messenger: May 1, 1905


John Swanson, one of the hands who are employed on the bridge gang, was quite badly hurt by a falling plank one day last week. The plank struck him in the face and resulted in breaking his nose and bruising his face in general.

Little Pearl Chase, of Trenton, North Dakota, arrived in Gowrie Monday  morning. Pearl is going to make her home with her aunt, Mrs. F.N. Brunson and attend school here as there is no school convenient where  her parents live.

Miss Ruby Osborn is sick at present with tonsilitis.

Mrs. Clark left here for Minneapolis Monday evening where she expects to visit with friends for a few days.

Little Gladys and Helen Spangler have been on the sick list lately.

Mr. and Mrs. Chase of Fort Dodge visited with their daughter, Mrs. T.N. Brunson, the fore part of the week.

Wedding bells are ringing. Have you heard their chimes?

Miss Lucy Chock who has been attending school in Clare, is visiting with her parents at present.

Walter Evans of Worthington, Minn. who has been visiting for a few days with his mother, Mrs. O.E. Evans, returned home Monday, accompanied by his two children who have been visiting with their grandmother for sometime.

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Johnson of Callender were visiting friends in Gowrie Sunday.

Mr. and Mrs. L. Burgoon of Paton were transacting business in Gowrie last Saturday.

The E.L. social held at the home of Mrs. and Mrs. Wertz was quite well attended in spite of the inclemency of the weather and about $9 was raised (about $216 today).

Mrs. Hibbard of Lorhville is visiting friends and relatives in town this week.

Oscar Lungren who is attending the Ames Agricultural college is home for the Easter vacation.