Archive for the ‘Coalville’ Category


Two Pretty Weddings

   Posted by: admin Tags: , , , , , , ,

The Lehigh Valley Argus: Oct. 26, 1906

Two Pretty Weddings

Mr. Hay and Miss Russell; Mr. McAnally and Miss Daniels

Both Weddings Held Wednesday.

The marriage of Miss Letitia Maud Russell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Russell of this place, and Mr. Archie Hay, of Coalville, occurred at the home of the bride’s sister, Mrs. Sam Reynolds, at high noon, on Wednesday, October 24th, 1906, Rev. H.C. Nissen of the M.E. church officiating. Only the relatives of the contracting parties attended the wedding. The bride was attired in a becoming gown of cream henrietta, trimmed in lace and silk applique and looked very handsome. The wedding march was played by the bride’s sister, Miss Ethel, while the happy couple took their places where solemn vows which made them man and wife were spoken. They were attended by the bride’s sister Miss Maggie Russell and Mr. Wm. Jordison. After the ceremony the company sat down to a bountiful wedding dinner.

The bride is well and favorably known in Lehigh and vicinity. Until recently she was one of the efficient “hello” girls of the Lehigh Telephone company in which capacity she has been employed during the past three years. She is a popular young lady holding the highest esteem of all acquaintances and friends, and is endowed with those womanly traits of character which make her loved and respected by all.
The groom is an industrious young man and is held in high esteem by those who know him well. This popular young couple will go to keeping house at Coalville, where the groom has prepared a home. The best wishes of a host of friends for a happy married life is given the happy couple.

■ ■ ■

The marriage of Miss Mollie Agusta Daniels, daughter of Mrs. W.H. Daniels, to Mr. Earl Baker McAnally, both of this place, occurred at the home of the bride’s mother on Wednesday evening, October 24th, 1906, Rev. H. C. Nissen of the M.E. church officiating. About sixty invited guests were present and the wedding was a very pretty affair. The house was prettily decorated with autumn foliage. The bride was attired in a beautiful gown of white silk. The happy couple was attended by Miss Maria Elsberry and Mr. James McAnally. Lohengrin’s wedding march was played by Mr. N.H. Tyson as the young couple took their place before the assembled guests. After the ceremony had been performed and congratulations had been given the happy couple, all sat down to an elaborate wedding supper of eight courses.

The bride is a member of one of Webster county’s prosperous and highly respected families and has a large circle of close friends. The groom is an industrious and thrifty young man who also has a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Both are popular Lehigh young people who are beginning their journey together in the brightest of life’s mornings. They have gone to keeping house at the home of the bride’s mother where they will remain this winter.

The Argus joins with the many friends of both couples in wishing them a happy and contented married life.

(Editor’s note: I find the differences in the descriptions of the two weddings to be interesting. You can tell the different social and economic statuses of the two couples even before being told that the second bride’s family is prosperous, just by the descriptions of the wedding dresses and wedding suppers, the number of guests at each wedding, and the fact that Leticia Russell worked before she was married.)


His Case is a Peculiar One

   Posted by: admin Tags: ,

The Fort Dodge Messenger: May 31, 1904

His Case is a Peculiar One

A Man With a Broken Back Lives Nearly Two Years – Case of Joel Johnson

The case of Joel Johnson of Coalville, whose death occurred Friday, is one of the most peculiar and sad ever occurring in Webster county.

It will be remembered the unfortunate man was hurt while working in a coal mine in Coalville nearly a year and a half ago. He was buried under a fall of coal and his back was broken just below the points of the shoulder blades. He was brought to the hospital in this city and in the hope of relieving the pressure on the spinal cord, an operation was performed. It was discovered, however, when the incision was made, that the spinal cord had been almost entirely severed. It was thought that man would live but a short time, but a part of the injured vertebra was removed and the patient recovered apparently his health, but of course, not retaining any action or feeling in any of the organs below the region of the injury. Having no relatives he was removed to Coalville, where he was cared for at the expense of the county. He gradually began to grow worse again after his return to Coalville and about six weeks ago became so bad he was brought back t o the hospital in this city, where he remained under the care of the county physician until death.

Previous articles:

Is Paralyzed From Waist Down

Juel Johnson in Sad Plight


Coalville Has More Coal Veins

   Posted by: admin Tags: , ,

The Fort Dodge Messenger: June 13, 1905

Coalville Has More Coal Veins

Favorable Prospects for New McEwen and Collins Mine.

The Shaft Has Been Finished

Was Pushed Down at Very Rapid Speed – Will Install Machinery and be Ready to Work Fifty Men by Next Winter – Excellent Facilities.

William McEwen of Coalville, was in Fort Dodge on Saturday and was able to report very favorable conditions on his new mine he is opening at Coalville. The Collins Brothers are interested with Mr. McEwen in the new mine which is located under the town of Coalville just alongside the railway track and near to the store. Many people had supposed that the coal deposits in this part of the town had been mined out long ago, but Mr. McEwen has demonstrated in his preliminary work of the past six months that there is a fine coal deposit there and he firmly believes it is of considerable size.

The prospecting drill demonstrated that there are two seams of coal, one at a depth of about 65 feet and the other about 80 feet down. Both veins are of lump coal of good quality and the top vein is about three and one-half feet thick and the lower four feet thick.

As soon as this was demonstrated and other drill holes had revealed the proof that a good many acres surrounding them were underlaid in the same way, Mr. McEwen started sinking a shaft and has just completed the work. It is a large shaft with three compartments, two for hoisting and the other for ventilation. The work was crowded with three shifts of men working eight hours each and the entire shaft was put down at an average speed of four feet per day. They went through some soft ground that required careful handling and through a great deal of very hard rock that needed large charges of dynamite. It was by no means an easy job to do so and the speed accomplished was very creditable.

Hoisting machinery will be installed and they will get the mine in shape to put large quantities of coal on the market this winter. Being right on the railroad track, they will be well equipped for shipping their product. They expect to work about fifty men net (sic – should be next) winter mining coal. There is but little water in the mine. They are able to hoist all that accumulates in the sump in twenty-four hours in about an hour and a half each day.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 5, 1904

Coalville Man Wins Automobile

Oscar Hult, a Young Man Employed in Coal Mines, has Lucky Number

Winning  Number is 30,358

Automobile Proves Popular, and No Dissatisfaction With Result.

One day last summer, Oscar Hult, a coal miner in the employ of the Gleason Coal company at Coalville, went into the Plymouth Clothing house and bought a suit of clothes. When the clerk wrapped them up he gave Mr. Hult ten tickets on the automobile, which was raffled off last Wednesday evening. During the last year different persons within a radius of fifty miles have bought clothing in Fort Dodge at the Plymouth because they wanted to get a ticket on the automobile. When the doors were opened Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock there was a large crowd waiting outside. The weather was fierce. Sweeping blasts from the northwest caused men to pull their coat collars a little  higher, but it did not deter them from being present and on time. It only required a short time to fill the store although special provisions had been made for the reception. The tables laden with clothing had been pushed pack and a temporary stage made in the center of the room On it the committee consisting of Will Cisne, R.E. Sherman, J.E. Downing, John Ruge, G.F. Rankin, Chas H. Colby and E.G. Healy, began the work of finding the lucky number. The tickets were placed in a large revolving church and after a thorough mixing one was drawn out. When it was read, there was a dead silence. There were no cries of “I have it.” Then twenty-nine others were drawn and called out to be used in case the first one did not come to light.

When the train from Coalville pulled into the station at noon today there was a large number of men and boys who alighted and made straight for the Plymouth. Oscar Hult only touched the ground a few times on his way down town. He had the lucky number clutched tightly in his hand and wore a smile that would not come off when he made known the fact at the Plymouth. His friends and associates shared in the joy with him. He concluded to leave his property where it is for the present, but expects to dispose of it in a short time. The drawing has been a great success as well as a great advertisement for the Plymouth. All those who held tickets were perfectly satisfied with the manner in which the raffle has been conducted. Mr. Hult is to be congratulated.