Archive for the ‘Church news’ Category


Lightning Strikes St. Olaf’s Church

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 15, 1906

Lightning Strikes St. Olaf’s Church

The Tower on the Corner of the Edifice Wrecked and Splintered

Damage Amounts to $200

Happened About 5:00 O’clock This Morning During Electrical Storm — Work of Repairing Damaged Parts Will Commence at Once

About 5:00 o’clock this morning, during the severe electrical storm, St. Olaf Lutheran Church, on the corner of south First Avenue and Fourth Street, was struck by lightning doing considerable damage. None of the residences in the neighborhood were struck or damaged in any way, though those living near heard the crashing of the timbers and the falling bricks, and were greatly frightened by it.

The lightning struck the topmost metal ornament on the steeple, and following the slanting roofs down, wrecked the tower greatly. Large holes were torn in the sides, shingles and bricks being thrown to the street below.

The extent of the damage is not exactly known. It has been placed at about two hundred dollars ($5,032 today), as the whole tower will have to be rebuilt and strengthened again. The damage to the interior is not very great, the frescoing being left in a fair condition.

Lightning also struck the disused Minneapolis and St. Louis station, wrecking a chimney and slightly damaging a portion of the roof. the building is the property of Andrew Hower and is used by the Hower & Hoffman flour store for a storehouse. The contents of the building were not damaged.

(Editor’s note: In the 1898 directory, the Minneapolis & St. Louis depot is listed at 1010 Sixth St. S.)

(Editor’s note: The 1908 Fort Dodge city directory lists the church location as First Avenue South, southwest corner Fourth. It was called St. Olaf’s Norwegian Lutheran Church then. That building is currently the Coppin Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church.)


German Lutheran Picnic Enjoyable

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The Fort Dodge Chronicle: July 5, 1907

(Editor’s note: The newspapers did not publish on holidays or Sundays during the early days of Fort Dodge, so we must use a July 5 article to show what happened on July 4.)

German Lutheran Picnic Enjoyable

The German Lutheran annual picnic at Oleson park the Fourth was one of the largest attended and most successful in the past few years. There was amusement for everybody and all day long games, races, contest and other features were indulged in. Clerks at the refreshment stands were occupied every minute waiting upon the people. A picnic dinner was served at noon, the members of the church bringing lunch baskets well filled with good things to eat. It was an enjoyable event for many and one long remembered.


Successful Picnic Held The Fourth

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The Fort Dodge Chronicle: July 5, 1907

(Editor’s note: The newspapers did not publish on holidays or Sundays during the early days of Fort Dodge, so we must use a July 5 article to show what happened on July 4.)

Successful Picnic Held The Fourth

The members of the German Evangelical Sunday school and church held the most successful picnic of years in the woods north of the city Thursday. The fun started early and at the noon hour all enjoyed a grand picnic dinner. In the afternoon games and races of all kinds were enjoyed by both old and young. Everybody present voted it the best picnic held by the church for years. The attendance was large and all present entered into the spirit of the occasion. The success financially exceeded the expectations of all and the society was enriched to the amount of about ninety dollars (about $2,079 today).

The Gazette and Messenger: May 19, 1878

Church Directory

Presbyterian Church

Rev. L.G. Gray, Pastor. Services at 10:50 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Sunday school at 12:15 p.m., W.H. Johnston, Superintendent. Prayer meeting Thursday evenings at 8 o’clock.

Methodist Episcopal Church

Rev. L. Hartsough, Presiding Elder; Rev. I.N. Pardoe, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Class meeting on Sabbath at 9:00 a.m. Prayer meetings on Thursday evening at 7:30 p.m. Sabbath school at 3:00 p.m. R.E. Carpenter, Superintendent. (Editor’s note: I’m not sure if the pastor is Pardoe or Pardee – my copy is fuzzy.)

Baptist Church

Rev. G.W. Freeman, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday school at 12 p.m.  Theo Hawley Superintendent. Prayer meeting on Thursday evening.

Congregational Church

Rev. Mr. Brekenridge, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Prayer meeting Thursday evening. Sabbath school immediately after morning services.

Episcopal Church

Rev. Mr. Mills, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Sabbath school at 12:00 p.m. Beth Vincent, Superintendent.

Catholic Church

Rev. T.M. Lenehen, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. Sabbath school at 2:00 p.m.

Evangelical Lutheran – German

Rev. J.L. Cramer, Pastor. Services at 10 a.m. Catechising the children at 1:30 p.m.

German Evangelical Association

Revs. G. Youngblood and F.W. Fisher, Pastors. Services at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday school at 11:30 a.m. Prayer meeting Wednesday evenings.

Swede Lutheran Church

Rev. P.A. Pihlgren, Pastor. Services at 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sunday school at 3 p.m. Prayer meeting on Thursday evenings.

Bible Depository

At Vincent and Meservey’s. Bibles and testaments published by the American Bible Society sold at cost.

The Seventh Day Adventist

Of Fort Dodge will hold meetings weekly on their Sabbath (Saturday) at the house of J.T. Reaser on Williams street. Time of meeting 2 p.m. An interest community cordially invited.

The Childrens’ Progressive Lyceum

Meets at Gue’s Hall every Sunday morning at 11 o’clock. Mrs. J. Swain, Conductor.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: April 4, 1914

Local News

Colonel Smith Here – Lieut. Colonel Smith of the Second Minnesota Regiment was in the city Friday, visiting with local officers of the national guard.

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To attend funeral – Paul E. Halfpap and Mrs. C.W. Leamon left Friday for Chicago where they wree called by the death of a relative.

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To Live in Duluth – Mr. and Mrs. C.D. Fitts expect to leave Fort Dodge soon for Duluth where they will live. Mr. Fitts who travels for the American Radiator Company has been transferred to Duluth.

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Uncle is Dead – Mrs. E.C. Bryant and Mrs. Arthur Anderson have received word of the death of their uncle at Rock Rapids. The deceased man is a brother of Attorney Ladd of Clarion, father of the two Fort Dodge women.

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Bethlehem Pastor Here – W.H. Linden of Rock Island, will be in the city during the Easter vacation and conduct the services at the Swedish Bethlehem church. Mr. Linden has accepted the call from this congregation and will be their pastor after his ordination next June.

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Family on Visit – Mrs. E.E. Hastings and son Robert and daughter Catherine, left today for Grundy Center. Mrs. Hastings and her daughter will go on to Cedar Rapids to visit at the home of the former’s mother and Robert will visit in Grundy Center for the week.

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Builds Beautiful Home – W.C. Tyrell, formerly of Fort Dodge and well known here as “Cap.” Tyrell, is building a beautiful country home a mile and a half south of Belmond. It is to be three stories in height, steam heated, electric lighted, with plumbing of the most modern kind and every other convenience now afforded.

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Her Brother Dies – Mrs. J.H. Torp today received word of the death of her brother at Los Angeles, California. Her mother, Mrs. Katharine Myers who has been spending the winter with Mrs. Torp, leaves for Rockland, Michigan, to attend the funeral. The body will be brought east.

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Reside Here for Time – Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Byerhoff have come here from South Dakota and have leased Mrs. Rose Wilbur’s house, 302 north Eighth street for their residence while Mr. Byerhoff is engaged in work for W.J. Zitterell, in construction of the Snell Building. Mr. Byerhoff assumes and office position for Mr. Zitterell.

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Passion Week Services – Subjects for Passion week at the Congregational Church are:

Monday evening – “The Story of Jesus’ Life.”
Tuesday Evening – A series of stereopticon pictures on Jesus’ Life and Ministry.
Wednesday Evening – “The Love Watch.” A story of the Bethany home will be interpreted by Mr. Minty.
Thursday evening a sermon “Gethsemane” and communion service Friday evening. A meeting for fellowship and prayer.

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Injured in Peculiar Accident – M.A. Hartwell, 1026 south Eighteenth street, is at his home incapacitated for some little time by injuries reported to have been received Thursday night about 7:00 when he was at work on a train of interurban cars switching near Gypsum. Mr. Hartwell was conductor on the train. Suddenly a car jumped the track and bounded along the ties. Mr. Hartwell jumped and in so doing struck a fence and is said to have several ribs broken and other injuries which have temporarily deprived him of the use of his legs. It is not though (sic – should be thought) he is fatally hurt. A peculiar circumstance in connection with the accident is that the car which left the track bounded along the ties for about fifty car lengths and then returned to the rails.

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Called to Hastings – H.S. Sanders was summoned to Hastings, Neb., to attend the funeral of a brother.

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Roads Drying Rapidly – A few days of drying weather will put the highways in pretty good shape again. The drags will be started in almost at once, in case it does not rain more.

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Agency Here – The Missouri Valley Oil Company of Omaha will install an agency in the city within a short time. E.M. Ouren, secretary and treasurer of the company, was in the city Friday making plans for the opening of an agency.

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Locate Here – The Gray Welding and cutting Company have located in the city at First avenue north and Twenty First street. The firm has as its officers, Elmer Gray, president and Charles Gray, manager. These young men have come here from welding factories in Chicago.

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Fort Dodge Holds Record – The naval recruiting station had more enlistments during the month of March than that of any other city in the Iowa district. Five men were sent in from here. There were fifteen applications of which six were accepted. One of those accepted has failed so far to enlist.

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Kirkpatrick Buys Residence – W.A. Kirkpatrick has purchased the Adalphine Langbehn property on First avenue north between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets. Mr. Kirkpatrick will occupy the property as a residence. The consideration was $2,700 ($58,044 today).

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Humorous Contest – Sixteen students of the high school competed for first, second, third and fourth places in the humorous contest that was h eld at the school Friday afternoon. Elizabeth Bedell was the winner and the others who managed to stay in for the finals are Behring Belt, Dorothy Monk and Bertha Johnson.

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Special Services at Saint Marks – There will be special services at Saint Mark’s church tomorrow in honor of Palm Sunday. The church has been decorated and the musical program will be exceptionally good. Mrs. F.W. Fuerman and Carl Kullenbeck will sing solos.

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Toll of Labor, Great Film – The Toll of Labor, the big five reel film that will be put on at the Magic Theatre Sunday and Monday, is one of the biggest feature films of the season. It contains the story of Emile Zola’s story, The Germinal. The film has been widely advertised for months in the picture journals, although it was only released March 16.

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Sees Interesting Views – T.W. Reely entertained a goodly sized audience at the Baptist church Friday evening, by an illustrated account of his European trip. Mr. and Mrs. Reely spent many months abroad while Mr. Reely made an especial study of architecture. They collected many attractive views in every place they visited and these with little personal aneodotes (sic) of the customs of the people, the talk was made very interesting. “We were interested,” said Mr. Reely “in studying the types of people, and in the churches we attended, we noticed they were just about  as varied as you would see at any gathering in this country, and quite similar.” Mr. Reely showed first, the views of England, including, besides London, quaint old towns, beautiful English gardens, and cities, Stratford on Avon, Castle of Varnick Oxford where the great university is located. “Every shire in England has some great man of whom it is proud,” said Mr. Reely. After England, Holland was visited, then came a trip down the Rhine, and to Luzerne and Italy. Antwerp he considered a city of  unusually attractive buildings. The beauty and variety of the towers of Cologne were other interesting features.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 26, 1906

Santa Claus Held Sway

Yesterday Given Up to The Observance of Christmas Day.

Good old Saint Nick, the knight of the sock, the reindeer and the big pack, reigned supreme yesterday and received his full share of homage in Fort Dodge. The day was given up to Christmas rejoicing, merrymaking, feasting and holiday celebrations all over the city.

Business was suspended, except such as had to be carried on through necessity, all over the city when the stores closed Monday night after the busiest day of the year 1906.

The Christmas sun rose radiant and the day continued throughout one of the most beautiful for the time of year that could have been wished for. Christmas gatherings, family reunions and church programs formed the main events of the day. The happenings are chronicled in part below:

At St. Mark’s.

One of the prettiest trees on Christmas eve was that of St. Mark’s Sunday school. Prior to the distribution of the gifts a program of recitations was given by Misses Grace Chantland, Ellen Clark, Elizabeth Wheeler, Martha Fransen, Evelyn Roper, Myrtle Drake and Katahrinee (sic) Francis. In spite of the fact that regular church is not being held the Sunday school has been suprintended (sic) very ably by Mr. Frank Griffith and the school teachers.

Dolliver’s Family Reunion.

At the Senator Dolliver home a family re-union was indulged in. Miss Gay Dolliver of Sioux City was present to enjoy the festivities of the day. “Uncle Vic” rigged himself up in fur coat and flowing beard to impersonate “Saint Nick” and succeeded in scaring a year’s growth out of the baby, George Prentiss Dolliver, and so confused Francis and Margaret that they were not sure of their bearings. They exhibited the same symptoms that a (shy?) colt does the first time he meets a steam roller and it took considerable assurance from the older heads before they could be brought to think that the impersonator was not a wild man who had invaded the home for the purpose of committing some terrible deed. After the youngsters had been quieted the program was carried on with merriment and the occasion made one that will linger long in the minds of those who were present to participate. The genial “Vic” succeeded in carrying out his part without destroying his borrowed plumage by fire or enacting any of the tragedies incident to the occasion. The younger member of the household has recovered from his scare but still retains an aversion to anything with long shaggy whiskers that speaks in muffled tones.

A Christmas Tree Fire.

A Christmas tree at the J.W. Amond home Christmas eve caused quite a little excitement by catching fire. No serious damage was done although the carpet was burned and Mr. Amond received a slight injury to his hand.

Remembered The Employes.

Among the most generous and most appreciated Christmas gifts were those received by the clerks of the Sturges company from their employer, Mr. L.E. Sturges. The gifts consisted of sums of money which were presented with the compliments of the season on Christmas eve.

Methodist Christmas Eve.

The surprise program of the Methodist Sunday School was one of hte most interesting and novel Christmas eve celebrations in the local churches. The church was decorated with two trees and festooned evergreen and strings of colored lights. In the centre (sic) of the choir loft was suspended a large star.

Nine classes took part in the evening’s celebration. Superintendent Dr. Money called upon each one in turn to give some literary or musical feature. Here are the classes:

Senior Bible Class – Scripture reading.
J.F. Nelson’s class – Piano solo, Miss Myrtle Parsons.
J.G. Early’s class – Album characters.
Miss Martin’s and Miss Houk’s classes in primary department – Sixty children in motion song.
Young men’s class, Mrs. J.G. Early, instructor – Cornet solo. Harry Sultzbaugh.
Miss Ruth Cummings’ class – Duet, Misses Sauerbrunn and Gregg.
Mrs. J.F. Monk’s class of boys – Recitation and chorus song.
James Sultzbaugh’s class of girls – Recitation – Miss Corenlia (sic) McBurney.
Miss Jeanette Early’s and Miss Phoebe Sultzbaugh’s classes – Chorus of 30 little girls.

The favorite number on the program was the album given by the young men and women of Mr. Early’s class. Here were shown pictures of members of the Early faily (sic – family?) in early days.

West Side M.E.

A Christmas program was held by the Sunday school classes of the West Side M.E. church Tuesday evening. A large crowd was present. A beautiful Christmas tree which held a gift for everyone present, and a fine program constituted the entertainment of the evening.

Railroad Offices Closed.

Yesterday there was not a railroad office in the city, with the exception of the Illinois Central dispatcher’s office, open. The railroad men one and all were making merry. On the Great Western freights 85 and 86 and the stucco special were annulled. On the M. and (S)t. L. the wayfreights were pulled off for the day. Business on the Illinois Central did not stop because of the holiday. The switch engines were busy in the yards all day and the traffic was as large as on any other day.

At Corpus Christi and Sacred Heart Catholic churches three morning masses were said. The first ones were at five and six thirty o’clock. They ended with the usual high mass at ten thirty. Sermons appropriate to the occasion were preached by the pastors.

Bring Back Gifts.

In almost every store along the street people can be seen today bringing back gifts to exchange them for a different design or size. Especially where the articles are gifts of clothing and a misfit resulted, is this to be noticed.

Merchants Invoice.

Now that the busy Christmas season has practically closed, many of the merchants along the streets are beginning to take their yearly invoice and perparing (sic) for straightening accounts, which always comes at the close of the year.


Give Six Hundred Dollars to Charity

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 18, 1905

Give Six Hundred Dollars to Charity

Unknown Corpus Christi Parishioner Will Give That Amount to  the Poor.

An announcement was made by Monsignor Lennihan (sic) at mass at Corpus Christi church Sunday morning which has created no little excitement among the members of the parish. It was to the effect that a lady member of the congregation had made known her intention of giving the sum of six hundred dollars (about $14,370 today) for charitable purposes at once.

The name of the coming donor was witheld (sic), but it was announced that some time ago she had made a mental resolve that if a certain desired wish was obtained she would advance the above sum for charitable purposes. That wish, stated Monsignor Lenihan has been realized, and the amount is to be given, as stated.

Much speculation is going on in the minds of the people of Corpus Christi as to the identify of the generous giver, whose name is kept concealed. The manner in which the money will be disposed of has not yet been announced.


The Congregational Bazaar

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 5, 1905

The Congregational Bazaar

In Crawford Building on North Sixth – Pretty Booths – Chicken Pie Supper Tonight.

The Crawford Building on North Sixth is the scene of the Congregational bazaar today and Wednesday. Booths of artistic design have been erected and trimmed with many different paper flowers. Yellow, and pink and blue booths, surround the walls, in which an unusually pretty display of Christmas gifts are temptingly arrayed.

The apron booth, which is in charge of Mrs. F.M. Ely, is hung in white curtains and trimmed with yellow chrysanthemums. At this booth fancy aprons and kitchen aprons can be secured. The Sunday School display at the next booth is worthy of comment. The boys have done their share here as well as the girls. An ironing board of beautiful symmetry is is (sic) one of the donations of the boys. Mrs. Charles Kline has a splendid booth of water color paintings which she has placed on sale at the bazaar. She is an adept at the work as her display plainly shows.  The baby booth in charge of Mrs. Eugene Hook, and the doll booth under the management of Mrs. Harry Vincent are artistically arranged along the north side of the room. Baby clothes of dainty texture are sold at the one and dolls of every variety are for sale at the other. Mesdames Charles Fisher and W.G. Jankins have charge of the fancy work booth which is filled with the finest of needlework.

A chicken pie supper will be served this evening at six o’clock to which all of the friends of the church are invited.


Miscellaneous notices

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Nov. 16, 1906

Eggs are Skyward

They Retail at 25 Cents, Which is Usual  Top Notch Price for Winter.

Fresh eggs are skyward and what is more grocers are at a loss to supply the trade at all. They are retailing at twenty-five cents a dozen and dealers are buying at twenty-four. The conditions are almost unprecedented and grocers hardly know what to make of them.

“I was up at Ruthven the other day,” said Mr. D.E. Leary, “and thought in a country town like that I could surely be able to pick up a few cases, but I was badly fooled. Eggs are as scarce there as they are here.  Some one got in a car load there a few days ago and they completely sold out in two days. I think it is possible the packers are trying to keep the prices up so that they can unload their storage supply at big prices.”

Thumb Badly Cut

Slight Accident Happens at the Fackler & McMullen Plant.

While at work in the machine department of the Fackler & McMullen plant, as the foot of Central Avenue, this morning, Jno. Sultzbaugh, an employe (sic), sustained a slight injury to his left thumb by a piece of flying metal. He was at work at a lathe at the time when the metal he held in his hand broke, one of the pieces striking the end of the thumb, cutting it severelyi.

Casualties None

Lone Aspirant Passes Initiation and Becomes Full Fledged Elk

One lone candidate for initiation awaited the pleasure of his to be brother Elks in the Elk’s quarters in the Mason building, last evening, and successfully passed through the ovation prepared for him. His name is Clyde Lunger, Kansas City Agent for the Banker’s Life Insurance Company of Des Moines, formerly located here in the interests of that company, and well known in the city.

Still Have Hope

The State Board Has Not Relinquished Idea of Locating Hospital Here

That the state board of control is still considering the probability of locating the state tuberculosis sanitarium here was demonstrated in a telephone convention (sic) held by Judge Robinson with a member of the local committee. In spite of the obstacles which lie in the way, the board is still looking towards Fort Dodge with favor, and will before the next general assembly, decide the site of the state institution in order to make a favorable report on the matter places in its hands.

Closes the Series

Sunday Night Will be Last of Dr. Gwilym’s Sermons.

Rev. D.V. Gwilym, D.D. of New York City, who has been conducting services in the First Methodist church the past two weeks, will close his work here tomorrow night. In view of the fact services will be held this afternoon and evening that as many of his expositions may be given as possible.

The largest audience greeted him last night that has been out yet, and the interest is constantly increasing. Sunday will doubtless be the great day of these meetings. Dr. Gwylym will preach both morning and evening, and every one is cordially invited to attend.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: July 18, 1905

Fiftieth Anniversary Episcopal Church

Saturday, July 22 Marks the Day of Organization.

The Church Will Celebrate

Ice Cream Social and Musical Program Will be Given On East Lawn of The Church – Appropriate Sermon Sunday.

This week and the Saturday of this week, mark the anniversary of the organization of the Episcopal parish in Fort Dodge, which occurred July 22, 1855. In commemoration of this coming event, the present prosperous church will give a lawn social on the east lawn of the church Saturday evening and will furnish a fine musical program as well as ice cream and cake. Sunday the present rector, Rev. Biggs, will deal largely with the history of the church in his address.

In a worn and almost yellow edged book, a record is to be found of the principal happenings of the church from the time of its organization.  The first item mentioned is of course, the organization of the church which was accomplished largely by land commissioners who were sent out here by President Buchanan. Names which are signed to the first resolution ever written by this church, will be found to be those old in history of the city as well as the church.

Just a year from the date of organization Bishop George Washington Lee proposed that if the church would raise $1,000 ($23,971 today) he would secure enough more funds to build a chapel, but this proposition was not accepted. Following this move, the first pastor, Rev. H.A. Wilson, but upon hearing that he had publicly denounced Free Masonry he was informed that his services would not be useful in this church and the Rev. Mr. Wilton therefore did not arrive in Fort Dodge.

February 1st in ’58 a committee was erected to raise funds to build a church. They resolved “to build a church 30×45 feet of stone or wood, with Gothic or pointed windows.” J.L. Cheney, E. Bagg and S.B. Olney were on the committee and Rev. Fairchild, who had been elected pastor, was delegated to go to Chicago to raise money for the church among the stronger churches there. On December 23, $1,420 ($35,333 today) had been expended, $699 ($17,392) had been paid out and the church was in debt $741($18,438). A frame church was being erected north of the site now occupied by Tobin college.

December 27th the vestry resolved “that we proceed with work on the church as heretofore, until the windows are in, one more door made, the buttons are one, the roof finished and all cracks stopped. Then suspend work until further action is taken.”

Action was indeed suspended and nothing more was done until after the war – to be exact until Easter, 1867. Rev. John Hochuly was next called to the Fort Dodge church. He (didn’t have?) any idea of how to manage affairs here, leaves a voluble record of his rectorate and resigned with almost nothing accomplished. Then nothing more was done until 1870 when Rev. E.H. Harlow was called to this place. The question of debt came up during this year, but nothing was accomplished, as Rev. Harlow had scarcely any idea of hom (sic) to manage affairs and extremely little idea of the value of money. He remained a year and having resigned, nothing was done until 1873, when Rev. Charles Stout was called.

Rev. Stout was a young man and  this was his first parish. He did excellent work and accomplished much toward liquidating the debt. The church had found themselves in dire straits when some of its creditors B. Grayson, H. Beecher, Webb Vincent, Beth Vincent, S.B. Olney and J.F. Duncombe donated their claims, almost wiping out the debt. Rev. Stout stayed about three years and the debt was about cleaned up. He asked the vestry if he might have services in Webster City and they conceded that he might do so one Sunday in six, “until such time as the railroad company changed its time tables.”

Rev. Stout’s resignation was received “most reluctantly” and following him, Rev. W.C. Mills was called and acepted (sic). During his pastorate there was the first informal talk of a new church. His pastorate was the longest the church had ever known and was prosperous in every way. Rev. Mills resigned in September, 1880, and no rector was called until all obligations could be wiped out. This was evidently accomplished by February, 1882, because Rev. C.C. Adams was called to the church and accepted. He remained a year and was succeeded by P.C. Wolcott, who also stayed about a year. Then the church was closed again for about a year.

Robert J. Walker was the next rector, and he began his pastorate by asking the vestry for a loan of $250 ($5,987). The records show that they considered it so long that it was dropped. Eight months later Rev. Robert Walker resigned. Rev. J.W. Paige followed him and was there until his death, serving the longest of any rector of the church. The records show his time of service to have been the most fruitful and prosperous the church had known and he was much beloved by all.

In January, 1892, the old church burned and measures were taken at once to secure a new church. The money on hand after the lot was sold and the insurance collected was $2,900 ($69,458). A subscription list was passed around and in a year the church aggregated the sum of $10,340 ($247,655). Plans were considered for a building to cost $10,000 and the contracts were about to be let when Rev. Paige died. At that time everything went slack and the new church matter was dropped. In April, 1893, the former plans were discarded and a new building committee, consisting of J.C. Cheney, Webb Vincent and A.J. Arthur were appointed with power to proceed with the original plans or adopt new ones. New plans were adopted and the present church as built. The architect was Clinton Nourse of Des Moines and the contract was let to Hepler and Brown. During the time of its erection, Sunday school services were kept up in what is now the Salvation Army hall. Mr. Rutka being the prime factor in this movement. He was ably assisted by Mrs. J.F. Duncombe, Misses Maude Lauderdale and Blanche Burnam.

Rev. A.V. Gorrell was the first pastor in the new church, remaining about a year after which Rev. C.H. Remington was called. Under his rectorate, the church was enlarged, the organ instituted and the church was successful in every way. His term of service was long and the church deeply regretted that failing health made his resignation necessary in 1904.

Rev. C.L. Biggs, the present rector, came to Fort Dodge the first of this year and has proved as excellent choice thus far in his work here.