Archive for the ‘Miscellaneous notices’ Category

Saturday Evening Post: Oct. 21, 1893

Life’s Eventful Drama

Touches of Tragedy and Chunks of Comedy to the Passing Play on the World’s Great Stage of Human Action.

The Players’ Entrances and Exits.

A Faithful Reproduction of Seven Days’ Scenes And Incidents in Local Life in Which We all Are Actors.

The “Midway Plaisance,” the name under which the social at the armory was given last Wednesday evening, was by no means a misnomer, for the hall was decorated, adorned and populated as one who had never seen the original Midway would imagine it might look. Booths attended by charming maidens adorned in various oriental costumes were scattered about over the large hall and the wares they handled went like red lemonade at a circus. The novelty of the name was the means of drawing a large crowd, and the result was a neat sum secured to the society, for whose benefit it was given.

A man who had been fleecing the counties of Kussuth (sic) and Humboldt with wolf skins, claimed to have been killed in these counties, and who had already worked Webster county for $35 in the same manner, was arrested here Wednesday while trying to work Auditor Cunningham for bounty on three more skins. He was taken to Kossuth county for prosecution.

Judge Hyatt granted an injunction this week restraining the county auditor from entering Rosanna Arnold’s property upon the tax book for guttering and curbing assessments. The description is lots 7 and 9 block 16 and the amount assessed was $441.00 (about $11,734 today). The property owner claims damage to the property by the grading that was done.

The Swedish Grieg Mandskor went to Badger last Tuesday to give one of their musical entertainments there for the benefit of the Norwegian Lutheran church. This organization is a very strong one, the chorus consisting of nearly twenty voices.

The committee on bridges let the contract last Tuesday for repairing the Lehigh bridge. Bids were as follows: J. Daniels & Co., $380; O.H. Larson, $447; C.T. Gustafson, $565; J.T. O’Connor, $595. The contract was given to Daniels & Co., who reside at Lehigh.

It appears that the prohibitionists of Webster county have reconsidered their endorsement of C.W. Newton for county treasurer and placed upon their ticket Mr. D.K. Lincoln instead. This is the way the ticket is filed with the county auditor.

The university of Iowa foot ball team got beautifully wallopped (sic) by the Denver atheletic (sic) club team in Denver last Saturday. The score stood 58 to 0. Should think the boys would be ashamed to come home.

Mrs. Jacob Mericle, of Holiday creek, one of Webster County’s pioneer settlers, died at her home last Wednesday, aged 72 years. She leaves a husband and a large family of children to mourn her loss.

A man in Meadville, Pa., has invented a barometer which not only indicates the weather in advance, but will sound a continuous alarm before the approach of cyclones and other death dealing storms.

The ladies of the Presbyterian church gave a most enjoyable social at the Armory last Friday evening. A large crowd was highly entertained by the very excellent musical program provided by the ladies.

John Koll has broken ground for a two story brick building, 22×30, on First avenue south, adjoining O.M. Oleson’s warehouse. Mr. Oleson will begin in a few days to veneer his with brick.

M.F. Byrne and Miss Kate McClarney were married at the home of the bride’s mother in this city Wednesday morning. The young couple left for Chicago on a wedding trip.

Four new recruits for the U.S. army have been secured in this city, as follows: S.A. Brown, Will H. Brown, Robert Curliss and Roscoe King. They all enlist for three years.

The vault door of the American Express company was closed a couple days this week, because the combination would not work. It had to be drilled open.

A. W. Braley has resigned his position with the Mason City Times and was spending a few days calling upon Fort Dodge friends the first of the week.


Local News

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Jan. 4, 1915

Local News

Annual Meeting

The annual meeting and banquet of the Plymouth Clay Products Company will take place Tuesday evening. The traveling men and stockholders are arriving in the city today, and all will be here for tomorrow.

Changes Position

Lou Brunenkant has resigned his position with the Strow Cigar Company and has taken one with Robert Wilson at the Conway Cigar Store. Brunenkant worked in his present position when the Conway Company had the place.

In New Position

Mrs. J.M. Spayde has resigned her position at the Cozy Tea Rooms and accepted one at the Drapery Shop.

Winter in California

Mr. and Mrs. A.S.R. Reynolds leave the last of the week for California where they will spend the winter.

Small Fire Today

The fire department were called about 2:00 p.m. today to the home of F.P. Schultz, 1504 Fifth avenue north. Whent he department arrived a small fire was discovered in the basement of the house. It is thought some rubbish which was piled near the furnace caught fire from the furnace causing the people to call the fire department. The fire was easily extinguished and practically no damage was done.

Purse Snatcher at Work

A home on First avenue north was entered precipitately Saturday evening about 9:30 by Miss Sarah Gallagher, who was badly frightened by a recent encounter with a purse snatcher. She explained that she had been walking between Central avenue and First avenue north when a man ran paster her and snatched at her purse. The purse handle broke, the purse fell to the ground and the man did not turn back to get it, but disappeared down an alley, running west. Miss Gallagher recovered her purse, which she said contained about fifty dollars (about $1,135 today).


Want Department

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The Evening Messenger: May 2, 1899

Want Department

For Sale or Rent. The building and fixtures formerly occupied by the Root & Howe meat market. Enquire of Mrs. L. Schultz.

For Sale Cheap. Two good lots with nice little cottage. Will sell at bargain if taken right away. Inquire of Coughlin & Trost.

For Sale. The Mitchell Implement Co. has two hundreds loads of good black dirt for sale.

For sale. Fine river sand. Enquire at this office.

For Sale Cheap. Business property on First avenue south, 40×140. Residence property on Fourth avenue north between Eleventh and Twelfth streets. Residence property on Sixth avenue north between Eleventh and Twelfth streets. Inquire at this office.

Girl Wanted. A girl for plain cooking. Apply at Harrington House.

Paper Hanging. C.C. Ames does first-class paper hanging and painting at reasonable prices. Address Lock Box 5, 911 Second avenue north.

Second hand store is the place to go if you want to buy or sell anything in the line of furniture, cook stoves or carpets. What have you to sell? C.L. Jewell, Proprietor, 2d door south of Court House.

Agents Wanted. By the Midland Life Associations. Good contracts offered to suitable parties. Apply at once.

Girl Wanted. Girl to do house work in family of two. Inquire at 402 north 7th street.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: April 4, 1914

Local News

Colonel Smith Here – Lieut. Colonel Smith of the Second Minnesota Regiment was in the city Friday, visiting with local officers of the national guard.

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To attend funeral – Paul E. Halfpap and Mrs. C.W. Leamon left Friday for Chicago where they wree called by the death of a relative.

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To Live in Duluth – Mr. and Mrs. C.D. Fitts expect to leave Fort Dodge soon for Duluth where they will live. Mr. Fitts who travels for the American Radiator Company has been transferred to Duluth.

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Uncle is Dead – Mrs. E.C. Bryant and Mrs. Arthur Anderson have received word of the death of their uncle at Rock Rapids. The deceased man is a brother of Attorney Ladd of Clarion, father of the two Fort Dodge women.

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Bethlehem Pastor Here – W.H. Linden of Rock Island, will be in the city during the Easter vacation and conduct the services at the Swedish Bethlehem church. Mr. Linden has accepted the call from this congregation and will be their pastor after his ordination next June.

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Family on Visit – Mrs. E.E. Hastings and son Robert and daughter Catherine, left today for Grundy Center. Mrs. Hastings and her daughter will go on to Cedar Rapids to visit at the home of the former’s mother and Robert will visit in Grundy Center for the week.

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Builds Beautiful Home – W.C. Tyrell, formerly of Fort Dodge and well known here as “Cap.” Tyrell, is building a beautiful country home a mile and a half south of Belmond. It is to be three stories in height, steam heated, electric lighted, with plumbing of the most modern kind and every other convenience now afforded.

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Her Brother Dies – Mrs. J.H. Torp today received word of the death of her brother at Los Angeles, California. Her mother, Mrs. Katharine Myers who has been spending the winter with Mrs. Torp, leaves for Rockland, Michigan, to attend the funeral. The body will be brought east.

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Reside Here for Time – Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Byerhoff have come here from South Dakota and have leased Mrs. Rose Wilbur’s house, 302 north Eighth street for their residence while Mr. Byerhoff is engaged in work for W.J. Zitterell, in construction of the Snell Building. Mr. Byerhoff assumes and office position for Mr. Zitterell.

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Passion Week Services – Subjects for Passion week at the Congregational Church are:

Monday evening – “The Story of Jesus’ Life.”
Tuesday Evening – A series of stereopticon pictures on Jesus’ Life and Ministry.
Wednesday Evening – “The Love Watch.” A story of the Bethany home will be interpreted by Mr. Minty.
Thursday evening a sermon “Gethsemane” and communion service Friday evening. A meeting for fellowship and prayer.

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Injured in Peculiar Accident – M.A. Hartwell, 1026 south Eighteenth street, is at his home incapacitated for some little time by injuries reported to have been received Thursday night about 7:00 when he was at work on a train of interurban cars switching near Gypsum. Mr. Hartwell was conductor on the train. Suddenly a car jumped the track and bounded along the ties. Mr. Hartwell jumped and in so doing struck a fence and is said to have several ribs broken and other injuries which have temporarily deprived him of the use of his legs. It is not though (sic – should be thought) he is fatally hurt. A peculiar circumstance in connection with the accident is that the car which left the track bounded along the ties for about fifty car lengths and then returned to the rails.

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Called to Hastings – H.S. Sanders was summoned to Hastings, Neb., to attend the funeral of a brother.

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Roads Drying Rapidly – A few days of drying weather will put the highways in pretty good shape again. The drags will be started in almost at once, in case it does not rain more.

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Agency Here – The Missouri Valley Oil Company of Omaha will install an agency in the city within a short time. E.M. Ouren, secretary and treasurer of the company, was in the city Friday making plans for the opening of an agency.

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Locate Here – The Gray Welding and cutting Company have located in the city at First avenue north and Twenty First street. The firm has as its officers, Elmer Gray, president and Charles Gray, manager. These young men have come here from welding factories in Chicago.

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Fort Dodge Holds Record – The naval recruiting station had more enlistments during the month of March than that of any other city in the Iowa district. Five men were sent in from here. There were fifteen applications of which six were accepted. One of those accepted has failed so far to enlist.

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Kirkpatrick Buys Residence – W.A. Kirkpatrick has purchased the Adalphine Langbehn property on First avenue north between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets. Mr. Kirkpatrick will occupy the property as a residence. The consideration was $2,700 ($58,044 today).

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Humorous Contest – Sixteen students of the high school competed for first, second, third and fourth places in the humorous contest that was h eld at the school Friday afternoon. Elizabeth Bedell was the winner and the others who managed to stay in for the finals are Behring Belt, Dorothy Monk and Bertha Johnson.

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Special Services at Saint Marks – There will be special services at Saint Mark’s church tomorrow in honor of Palm Sunday. The church has been decorated and the musical program will be exceptionally good. Mrs. F.W. Fuerman and Carl Kullenbeck will sing solos.

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Toll of Labor, Great Film – The Toll of Labor, the big five reel film that will be put on at the Magic Theatre Sunday and Monday, is one of the biggest feature films of the season. It contains the story of Emile Zola’s story, The Germinal. The film has been widely advertised for months in the picture journals, although it was only released March 16.

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Sees Interesting Views – T.W. Reely entertained a goodly sized audience at the Baptist church Friday evening, by an illustrated account of his European trip. Mr. and Mrs. Reely spent many months abroad while Mr. Reely made an especial study of architecture. They collected many attractive views in every place they visited and these with little personal aneodotes (sic) of the customs of the people, the talk was made very interesting. “We were interested,” said Mr. Reely “in studying the types of people, and in the churches we attended, we noticed they were just about  as varied as you would see at any gathering in this country, and quite similar.” Mr. Reely showed first, the views of England, including, besides London, quaint old towns, beautiful English gardens, and cities, Stratford on Avon, Castle of Varnick Oxford where the great university is located. “Every shire in England has some great man of whom it is proud,” said Mr. Reely. After England, Holland was visited, then came a trip down the Rhine, and to Luzerne and Italy. Antwerp he considered a city of  unusually attractive buildings. The beauty and variety of the towers of Cologne were other interesting features.


Some People

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Feb. 15, 1907

Some People

Sent those funny (?) but vulgar valentines Thursday.

Anticipate a big building boom in Fort Dodge this year.

Believe the Grundhog (sic) a bum weather prophet.

Think two cents a mile rides will be pretty fine.

Take lots of care of themselves but are not as healthy as the careless.

Read every line of the Thaw trial before they eat, then tell how rank they think it all is.

Keep their children at home after 9 p.m. and some do not.

Can’t see how little time the public has for croakers and calamity howlers.


What They Say

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Jan. 22, 1907

What They Say

“I think the next building season will be good in Fort Dodge – plenty of work in sight for brick layers.”
-Geo. Guth.

“A Humboldt county farmer has a calf which was born without eyes or tail. An effort will be made to get it to exhibit at the Redmen circus.”
-Alfred DeLano.

“In view of the proposed use of water power fro the Des Moines river I suggest for the booster button the motto ‘Don’t knock: just dam.”
-Member Commercial Club.

“Some of the horses about Fort Dodge look as if they were not fit to be in service. They are two thin to be at work. One sees dray teams and hack teams that look as  if they needed a few weeks of rest badly. I always like to see dumb animals receive good care and it seems as if a real S.P.C.A. is needed here.”
-A Citizen.


Miscellaneous notices

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Nov. 16, 1906

Eggs are Skyward

They Retail at 25 Cents, Which is Usual  Top Notch Price for Winter.

Fresh eggs are skyward and what is more grocers are at a loss to supply the trade at all. They are retailing at twenty-five cents a dozen and dealers are buying at twenty-four. The conditions are almost unprecedented and grocers hardly know what to make of them.

“I was up at Ruthven the other day,” said Mr. D.E. Leary, “and thought in a country town like that I could surely be able to pick up a few cases, but I was badly fooled. Eggs are as scarce there as they are here.  Some one got in a car load there a few days ago and they completely sold out in two days. I think it is possible the packers are trying to keep the prices up so that they can unload their storage supply at big prices.”

Thumb Badly Cut

Slight Accident Happens at the Fackler & McMullen Plant.

While at work in the machine department of the Fackler & McMullen plant, as the foot of Central Avenue, this morning, Jno. Sultzbaugh, an employe (sic), sustained a slight injury to his left thumb by a piece of flying metal. He was at work at a lathe at the time when the metal he held in his hand broke, one of the pieces striking the end of the thumb, cutting it severelyi.

Casualties None

Lone Aspirant Passes Initiation and Becomes Full Fledged Elk

One lone candidate for initiation awaited the pleasure of his to be brother Elks in the Elk’s quarters in the Mason building, last evening, and successfully passed through the ovation prepared for him. His name is Clyde Lunger, Kansas City Agent for the Banker’s Life Insurance Company of Des Moines, formerly located here in the interests of that company, and well known in the city.

Still Have Hope

The State Board Has Not Relinquished Idea of Locating Hospital Here

That the state board of control is still considering the probability of locating the state tuberculosis sanitarium here was demonstrated in a telephone convention (sic) held by Judge Robinson with a member of the local committee. In spite of the obstacles which lie in the way, the board is still looking towards Fort Dodge with favor, and will before the next general assembly, decide the site of the state institution in order to make a favorable report on the matter places in its hands.

Closes the Series

Sunday Night Will be Last of Dr. Gwilym’s Sermons.

Rev. D.V. Gwilym, D.D. of New York City, who has been conducting services in the First Methodist church the past two weeks, will close his work here tomorrow night. In view of the fact services will be held this afternoon and evening that as many of his expositions may be given as possible.

The largest audience greeted him last night that has been out yet, and the interest is constantly increasing. Sunday will doubtless be the great day of these meetings. Dr. Gwylym will preach both morning and evening, and every one is cordially invited to attend.


“Take Notice”

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Sept. 18, 1905

“Take Notice”

From and after this date I will not be responsible for any debts contracted by Mrs. Aroline Liess.

Fred Leiss


What They Say

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Sept. 17, 1906

What They Say

“I wouldn’t give an acre of my land for any section of Canadian land.” – A Webster county farmer.

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F.J. Blake has gone to Illinois on a land business trip.

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James Barton and Robert Heath left this morning for Iowa City where they will attend school.

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“Rains keep the corn green and growing as it should now.” – C.E. Griffith.

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“Now that the cold weather has come on we get more to eat than we did during the hot weather. The family has been subsisting on cold meals for the most part during the hot summer months. The gas range was on duty creating bills for the end of hte month and was used as sparingly as possible. Now that the cook stove is on duty good warm meals are prepared.” – A Thankful Husband.

The Fort Dodge Messenger: July 5, 1904

The family of Mr. and Mrs. James Kincaid, of this city, was increased on Saturday night by the arrival of a bright baby girl.

Tom Joyce, who has been suffering from an attack of pneumonia, is now regarded as on the road to recovery. His physicians this morning benefited him and it is now thought that he will recover, being so strong and robust no fear is entertained of his not making good progress from now own.

Mr. and Mrs. Dan Pearsons were host and hostes (sic) to a jolly Fourth of July picnic party at their home just north of the city. It was more in the nature of an old-fashioned Fourth of July. The hospitality of the host and hostess made the day one long to be rememberes. The families there were those of D.K. Lincoln, J.P. Dolliver and Geo. R. Pearsons.

Invitations are out for the wedding of Harry Emmett Peterson, of this city to Miss Ella Lorena Hanson, of Lehigh. The event will take place on the 14th of this month at high noon, at the home of the bride’s pahents (sic), in Lehigh. The groom is well known throughout the city, being one of the partners in the newly formed coal firm of Collins & Peterson. The bride is one of Lehigh’s most popular young ladies and is also well known in this city.