Archive for the ‘Society news’ Category

The Fort Dodge Messenger: April 4, 1914

Local News

Colonel Smith Here – Lieut. Colonel Smith of the Second Minnesota Regiment was in the city Friday, visiting with local officers of the national guard.

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To attend funeral – Paul E. Halfpap and Mrs. C.W. Leamon left Friday for Chicago where they wree called by the death of a relative.

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To Live in Duluth – Mr. and Mrs. C.D. Fitts expect to leave Fort Dodge soon for Duluth where they will live. Mr. Fitts who travels for the American Radiator Company has been transferred to Duluth.

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Uncle is Dead – Mrs. E.C. Bryant and Mrs. Arthur Anderson have received word of the death of their uncle at Rock Rapids. The deceased man is a brother of Attorney Ladd of Clarion, father of the two Fort Dodge women.

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Bethlehem Pastor Here – W.H. Linden of Rock Island, will be in the city during the Easter vacation and conduct the services at the Swedish Bethlehem church. Mr. Linden has accepted the call from this congregation and will be their pastor after his ordination next June.

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Family on Visit – Mrs. E.E. Hastings and son Robert and daughter Catherine, left today for Grundy Center. Mrs. Hastings and her daughter will go on to Cedar Rapids to visit at the home of the former’s mother and Robert will visit in Grundy Center for the week.

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Builds Beautiful Home – W.C. Tyrell, formerly of Fort Dodge and well known here as “Cap.” Tyrell, is building a beautiful country home a mile and a half south of Belmond. It is to be three stories in height, steam heated, electric lighted, with plumbing of the most modern kind and every other convenience now afforded.

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Her Brother Dies – Mrs. J.H. Torp today received word of the death of her brother at Los Angeles, California. Her mother, Mrs. Katharine Myers who has been spending the winter with Mrs. Torp, leaves for Rockland, Michigan, to attend the funeral. The body will be brought east.

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Reside Here for Time – Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Byerhoff have come here from South Dakota and have leased Mrs. Rose Wilbur’s house, 302 north Eighth street for their residence while Mr. Byerhoff is engaged in work for W.J. Zitterell, in construction of the Snell Building. Mr. Byerhoff assumes and office position for Mr. Zitterell.

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Passion Week Services – Subjects for Passion week at the Congregational Church are:

Monday evening – “The Story of Jesus’ Life.”
Tuesday Evening – A series of stereopticon pictures on Jesus’ Life and Ministry.
Wednesday Evening – “The Love Watch.” A story of the Bethany home will be interpreted by Mr. Minty.
Thursday evening a sermon “Gethsemane” and communion service Friday evening. A meeting for fellowship and prayer.

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Injured in Peculiar Accident – M.A. Hartwell, 1026 south Eighteenth street, is at his home incapacitated for some little time by injuries reported to have been received Thursday night about 7:00 when he was at work on a train of interurban cars switching near Gypsum. Mr. Hartwell was conductor on the train. Suddenly a car jumped the track and bounded along the ties. Mr. Hartwell jumped and in so doing struck a fence and is said to have several ribs broken and other injuries which have temporarily deprived him of the use of his legs. It is not though (sic – should be thought) he is fatally hurt. A peculiar circumstance in connection with the accident is that the car which left the track bounded along the ties for about fifty car lengths and then returned to the rails.

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Called to Hastings – H.S. Sanders was summoned to Hastings, Neb., to attend the funeral of a brother.

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Roads Drying Rapidly – A few days of drying weather will put the highways in pretty good shape again. The drags will be started in almost at once, in case it does not rain more.

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Agency Here – The Missouri Valley Oil Company of Omaha will install an agency in the city within a short time. E.M. Ouren, secretary and treasurer of the company, was in the city Friday making plans for the opening of an agency.

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Locate Here – The Gray Welding and cutting Company have located in the city at First avenue north and Twenty First street. The firm has as its officers, Elmer Gray, president and Charles Gray, manager. These young men have come here from welding factories in Chicago.

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Fort Dodge Holds Record – The naval recruiting station had more enlistments during the month of March than that of any other city in the Iowa district. Five men were sent in from here. There were fifteen applications of which six were accepted. One of those accepted has failed so far to enlist.

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Kirkpatrick Buys Residence – W.A. Kirkpatrick has purchased the Adalphine Langbehn property on First avenue north between Seventeenth and Eighteenth streets. Mr. Kirkpatrick will occupy the property as a residence. The consideration was $2,700 ($58,044 today).

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Humorous Contest – Sixteen students of the high school competed for first, second, third and fourth places in the humorous contest that was h eld at the school Friday afternoon. Elizabeth Bedell was the winner and the others who managed to stay in for the finals are Behring Belt, Dorothy Monk and Bertha Johnson.

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Special Services at Saint Marks – There will be special services at Saint Mark’s church tomorrow in honor of Palm Sunday. The church has been decorated and the musical program will be exceptionally good. Mrs. F.W. Fuerman and Carl Kullenbeck will sing solos.

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Toll of Labor, Great Film – The Toll of Labor, the big five reel film that will be put on at the Magic Theatre Sunday and Monday, is one of the biggest feature films of the season. It contains the story of Emile Zola’s story, The Germinal. The film has been widely advertised for months in the picture journals, although it was only released March 16.

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Sees Interesting Views – T.W. Reely entertained a goodly sized audience at the Baptist church Friday evening, by an illustrated account of his European trip. Mr. and Mrs. Reely spent many months abroad while Mr. Reely made an especial study of architecture. They collected many attractive views in every place they visited and these with little personal aneodotes (sic) of the customs of the people, the talk was made very interesting. “We were interested,” said Mr. Reely “in studying the types of people, and in the churches we attended, we noticed they were just about  as varied as you would see at any gathering in this country, and quite similar.” Mr. Reely showed first, the views of England, including, besides London, quaint old towns, beautiful English gardens, and cities, Stratford on Avon, Castle of Varnick Oxford where the great university is located. “Every shire in England has some great man of whom it is proud,” said Mr. Reely. After England, Holland was visited, then came a trip down the Rhine, and to Luzerne and Italy. Antwerp he considered a city of  unusually attractive buildings. The beauty and variety of the towers of Cologne were other interesting features.

30
Mar

They Visited Real Volcano

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 30, 1903

They Visited Real Volcano

Fort Dodge Travelers in Far Off Hawaii Make the Most of Their Opportunities

An Interesting Experience

E.G. Larson and L.A. Thorson Peer Into Blazing Crater of Mighty Halemaumau

E.G. Larson and L.A. Thorson not only saw Honolulu during their trip to the Hawaiian islands, but were also favored with the unusual opportunity of looking down into the blazing crater of a real and semi-active volcano. The volcano visited by Messrs. Thorson and Larson rejoices in the euphonious name of Halemaumau. They were among  the passengers of the steamer Mauna Loa, the details of whose interesting trip are given by the Hawaiian Star, one of the metropolitan looking dailies of Honolulu.

the following report of the trip is taken from a copy of the Star, which was forwarded to the Messenger by Messrs. Larson and Thorson.

“There is fire in the crater of Halemaumau. The fire has been going day and night. News of the fire was brought this morning by a large party of tourists who returned from the volcano by the steamer Mauna Loa. The party went up to the volcano n early two weeks ago.

“From the statements of those in the party, the center of activity is a well defined portion of the pit. A place which was said to be about fifty feet in diameter was the particular center of activity. The lava was bubbling in this place. Evidently a greater portion of the flood of the inner crater is affected. What would appear to those above the floor of the pit to be fifty feet in diameter would be much greater. The spectators had to look down about 1,500 feet and a space fifty feet in diameter would appear nothing but a tiny speck from such an elevation.

“Quantities of steam were to be seen arising from numerous places in the big crater proper.”

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 20, 1906

Fort Dodge’s Live Ones: Welch Brothers

Welch Brothers, “Sam and Ed,” are not very old yet, but in proportion to their years they have been the shoe business a long time and have learned about all the points there are to be discovered about the trade.

Sam Welch went to work for C.M. Rudesill as a boy twenty years ago, spending his time out of school hours at the shoe store. He was with Mr. Rudesill about twelve years; then went to Minneapolis, and was with A. Knoblauch for six years. Returning to Fort Dodge he had charge of the shoe departmetn of the Boston store for a short time and then was with the Richardson shoe company of Menominee, Michigan, for one and one-half years as traveling salesman.

Ed Welch has been in the shoe business twelve years – four years with C.F. Wennerstrom, four years with the Larson Dry Goods company and four years with the Green Wheeler shoe company on the road.

The Welch Brothers bought the shoe stock of Edward Rank last September and formed the partnership which promises to be a marked success. the extensive experience of the owners of this establishment gives them every advantage in buying goods and their wide acquaintance in Fort Dodge, this having always been their home, gives them the advantage in selling in large quantities.

They are pushing the “Welch Brothers Brand” of shoes, rather than the make of any particular factory, having faith in their ability to select the best quality of goods in their line – a product they are willing to vouch for with their name.

12
Dec

Fort Dodge’s Live Ones: A.D. McQuilkin

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 12, 1906

Fort Dodge’s Live Ones: A.D. McQuilkin

As the owner of “The Big Store with little prices,” A.D. McQuilkin is most familiarly known, but there are other names that might serve to designate him. One is the word “Hustler.” Another is  his title of President of the Iowa Retail Furniture Dealers’ Association, which place he has filled with credit since a year ago last June. No one deserves a place among Fort Dodge’s live ones better than Mr. McQuilkin. Where questions of the city’s progress are brought up he is always found in the front rank and willing to carry the banner.

Of course, if the city’s wagon were the real thing, not figurative, Mr. McQuilkin’s shoulder at the wheel would not cause it to fly, for he doesn’t measure up well with the ringside stalwarts. But when it comes to a matter of push, as those who understand know the word, he is right on the firing line with the fellows who are making the wheels of Fort Dodge progress hum. And in this line his efforts are such that when the bunch gets out to boost his place is always reserved for him.

Not satisfied with seeing Fort Dodge grow away from him, Mr. McQuilkin has instead decided to do a little of the leading himself, and just to show what real enterprise is like  he now decides to build and start next door to his present big furniture store another one equally large which will give him the room that he needs to expand his business along progressive ideas. The two will be connected with an overhead passageway.

The friend suggested the other way that when the two stores were running Mr. McQuilkin might have some trouble in adapting his business byword, “The Big Store with little prices,” to the change, “for,” said the friend, “to have it read ‘The two big stores with the too little prices’ wouldn’t sound right” Mr. McQuilkin responded to the jest by saying it “guessed he would have to call it The bigger store with the littler prices.”

10
Dec

Fort Dodge’s Live Ones: Mack Hurlbut

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 10, 1906

Fort Dodge’s Live Ones: Mack Hurlbut

No more appropriate classification of Mack Hurlbut, who is shown in the above sketch, could be made than to place him among Fort Dodge’s live ones. Mack is a live wire at all times and stands with the men who make Fort Dodge a town that has to be handled with rubber gloves.

Every man has a few characteristics that make him different from his fellows; without them humankind would be as a flock of sheep, “black or white” would be our only distinguishing point. Mack, in the making, was given enough of these points and characteristics to make him a distinctly original and individual person. In short they are, first of all brains, pluck, aggressiveness, true business instinct, executive ability,  unlimited energy and an attractive personality.

The numerous years that Mack has spent in Fort Dodge, during the biggest and best jewelry stores which time he has build up one of the in Iowa, have demonstrated these points to every resident of the city. For the benefit of those who haven’t sized up, through mere observation we will go into detail a little.

One needs only to enter Mack’s store on Central Avenue to see the result of his brains. Its arrangement, perfect to detail, proclaim them on every hand. As to his pluck – it is a byword with all who know him. Ask the burglars who broke his window and rifled it last year, and whom he doggedly pursued with wily schemes and hounded with detectives, about his pluck. His aggressive spirit shows in every business move for continual push is, and always has been, his policy. For true business instinct and executive ability he have only to look back and recall a vision of a long-legged and thin, raw boned boy sitting on a stool learning to repair watches, then note his present condition, to see the exercise of these two abilities. Unlimited energy tells its tale in his own watchword “sleepless and restless.”

(Editor’s note: I type these as they are in the original. The sentence in italics in the third paragraph should read The numerous years that Mack has spent in Fort Dodge, during which time he has build up one of the the biggest and best jewelry stores in Iowa, have demonstrated these points to every resident of the city.)

9
Dec

Blanden Scores a Success as Hamlet

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 9, 1903

Blanden Scores a Success as Hamlet

Fort Dodge Man is Praised for Work Before the Footlights.

He Plays the Title Role

Lon Blanden, Son of Colonel L. Blanden, and a Native of This City.

Every little while, a new Fort Dodge man comes out into the lime light of fame. The latest son of Fort Dodge to attain noticeable mention is Lon Blanden. Mr. Blanden is the nephew of Col. L. Blanden, and the brother of the well known poet, Charles Blanden, who is also a son of Fort Dodge, though for years he has been a successful business man of Chicago.

Lon Blanden was a resident of Fort Dodge in his young manhood. He had a magnificent voice and was prominent in musical circles. His ability as an actor, both on the state and in real life, was often remarked by his friends and when he went on the stage some years ago it was felt that he would surely gain an enviable reputation. The hopes of his friends have been longer delayed than was expected, but the opportune time has come for Mr. Blanden to leave light comedy and melodrama and take upon himself some more notable parts. He is especially suited in his face, manner and gifts for tragedy, and the announcement that he is starring in Hamlet is not a surprise to his acquaintances here. The following is from the Providence Journal:

“It was a distinctly creditable presentation in which the feature was the strong and powerful playing of Mr. Lon Blanden, as the Prince of Denmakr. Mr. Blanden is a player of the legitimate school who follows in his characterization of the great Dane, the advice of Hamlet to the players and who gave a scholarly and remarkably able exposition of this great character study. His playing would attract attention in a more pretentious production; coming as it does in a week’s work of a summer stock company, playing at popular prices, it is the more unusual. His enunciation was clear and usually distinct; he gave the soliloquies with dramatic force and his whole conception of the role was apparent as the result of years of study of the most interesting of Shakespeare’s characters. It was a worthy effort, that stands out from the work of the other members of the company, although his support was uniformly good and in several respects especially so.” – The Providence Journal

1
Nov

Badger Woman is Centenarian

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Nov. 1, 1905

Badger Woman is Centenarian

Celebrates Her One Hundredth Birthday Sunday at Her Badger Home.

Her Energies are Un-impaired

Her Hair Has Not Yet Turned Competely Gray, While She is Able to Knit and Also to Read. – Walk to Church on Sunday Mornings.

Mrs. Sarah Hanson of Badger celebrated her one hundredth birthday Sunday by having twenty relatives and many friends to dinner. Her birthday was on Thursday, but the celebration did not take place until Sunday, as more of the relatives could come on that day than on Sunday.

Mrs. Hanson was born in Norway on October 26th, and resided in her native country until about thirty-eight years ago when she came to American (sic) and then to Badger, where she has resided constantly ever since. She has been married twice, her first husband dying before she came to America. This husband was William Williamson. Two years after she came to Badger, she was married to Peter Hanson, twenty years her junior, who still is living.

By her first husband she had two children, Ole Williamson of Badger (and) Knute Williamson of Wisconsin, both living. The oldest son is sixty-eight years of age. Mrs. Hanson has two brothers, both of whom are living at this time.

Both of these brothers reside in Illinois, one being ninety-eight years of age and the other ninety-six. For a family of long lived people, the Williamson family, certainly should be up near the top. Neither of these brothers were able to come to their sister’s anniversary, but both sent congratulations. Her son living in Wisconsin, also sent a letter of congratulations to his mother and this was read at the celebration.

At the Sunday celebration, there were four generations present, the oldest great grandchild being sixteen years of age. There were several other great grandchildren present and a family picture was taken, and also one of the four generations.

Mrs. Hanson generally walks to church every Sunday but at this was her anniversary an dso (sic) many were coming she refrained from doing so.

A big dinner was served during the day to the assembled guests most of whom were relatives but several were friends. The pastor of the church Mrs. Hanson attends, was also at the celebration and made a long address, complimenting her and telling of her interesting life.

Mrs. Hanson is well preserved in every way, and today is able to get around in a manner to make a woman of seventy jealous. Besides her trips to church, seh knits almost constantly. She is also able to read and enjoys this very much.

Her hair is black in places, and although the gray shows, yet it is that of a woman much younger. Her hearing, although somewhat impaired is yet good, and she is able to hear an ordinary conversation. At the Sunday celebration she joined in the merrymaking with all and enjoyed the day greatly. Everyone congratulated her, and in return she told stories of her early life in far away Norway.

She told reminiscences of her childhood days, which greatly surprised, her hearers, who thought that surely her memory must have been impaired by the many years of life. However her stories were told with a vim and were very interesting to all. During the day she related storeis that would fill many a volume and stories that would rival those of fiction.

Her condition is such that her relatives feel that she will live for many years, for her vigor is equal to that of a woman much younger. Among the relatives at the celebration were Mr. and Mrs. O.O. Stageberg and children, who reside on Round Prairie in this city. Mrs. Stageberg is a grandchild of Mrs. Hanson.

23
Sep

City News

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The Fort Dodge Daily Chronicle: Sept. 23, 1910

City News

Marriage License
James B. Apland Kalo
Josie Hotek Kalo

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Divorce Suit Dropped.

The divorce suit filed by Guy Walrod against his wife, Muriel Walrod, on the grounds of desertion has been dropped by the plaintiff and stricken from the district court docket.

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Settlement is Reached

The case of George Townsend vs. Mrs. J.M. Beavers, assigned for trial at the present term of the district court, has been dismissed by the plaintiff at his cost.

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Small Judgment Given

The jury in the case of Wm. Oberton vs. J.B. Black, on trial in the district court brought in a verdict awarding the plaintiff damages in the sum of $8 as a result of the defendant’s cattle trespassing on his corn fields.

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Another Case Settled.

The case of Conrad Brown and Anna Brown vs. The Fort Dodge Brick and Tile Co., slated for trial at the present term of the district court, has been settled out of court, the defendant company paying the plaintiff the sum of $310 as a result of an accident suffered by their son.

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Jury is Excused

Wednesday evening, owing to the settlement and continuation of many cases assigned for trial in the district court during the present week, Judge C.G. Lee dismissed the petit jurors for remainder of the present week. They will report Monday afternoon at 1:30 for service during the coming week.

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Divorce Granted

Thursday afternoon Judge C.G. Lee in the district court granted a divorce to Jessie Davenport on the grounds of desertion. The number of divorces granted during the two weeks court has been in session is nearly a record breaker.

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Funeral on Saturday

The funeral of the late P. Henry Vaughan, who passed away on Wednesday evening as a result of a stroke of apoplexy suffered on Tuesday morning, will be held at 9:30 on Saturday morning from Corpus Christi, with interment in Corpus Christi cemetery. All of the members of the family of the deceased are in the city to attend the funeral.

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Paving is Delayed

The rain of Thursday called for a cessation of the paving work in the city, and this morning the employes (sic) are taking a still longer enforced vacation as a result of continued inclement weather. Up to the present time the men have been able to push their work with a pleasing degree of speed and little time has been lost through bad weather.

14
Sep

R.M. M’Cabe to Marry

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Sept. 14, 1906

R.M. M’Cabe to Marry

Former City Editor of the Chronicle Will Wed in Logan.

On Tuesday September the 18th, Mr. R.M. McCabe, former city editor of the Chronicle, and Miss Loenteen Arthur of Logan, Iowa, will be wed. This announcement comes as a surprise to a great many of Mr. McCabe’s friends in Fort Dodge. He was at one time engaged in the newspaper business in this city, but during the past year has been editing, together with his father, the Logan Observer.

The Fort Dodge Daily Chronicle: Sept. 11, 1908

Memories of The Past Are Awakened by Visit to Leipzig

Mrs. John F. Duncombe Writes an Interesting Letter of Her Revisit to the German City She Resided in For Three Years With Her Daughters – Other Matters of Interest.

We are now in good old Leipzig with lovely weather and both of us well, and  having a good time. We have visited the place the girls and I called home for three years and as John and I entered the hall door and walked up the familiar stairs, memories of the past came over me and I could not but feel sad. The friends of long ago, where were they all? Gone, move of them, to that bourne from whence no traveller returns. I remember how pleased your father was with our beautiful little German home, and of his saying, “Well, I heartily approve of this, it if fine,” but that is all in the past.

John and I went all through the great conservatory. All the students have gone for their vacations and the whole place is being renovated and made ready for the fall term. I took John through the Auerbachshof, the wine cellar in which Goethe wrote Faust – made famous by Keller. We enjoyed the collection of renowned Faust pictures, dating back to the year 1525. We also visited the Furinjerhof and the celebrated Thomas Kirche – (church) where we used to go to hear the boys sing on Saturday morning. I called on some of my old German friends and they all knew me at once. We went to find Mrs. Nicholson and Nana, but they are up on the Hartz and will not be back until next week, so we were disappointed and I feel sure they will regret not seeing some one from home. John and I went to view the battle ground of Leipzig, and we saw the fine monument Germany is erecting to the memory of this great victory. They already have a small stone placed where Napoleon stood when commanding his army. It is all very interesting and as the morning was a bright, beautiful one our drive was very enjoyable. We will leave here for Dresden tomorrow, and remain there until we have seen all we care to see;  then on to Berlin and be ready for a plunge into Switzerland.

I hope my cabled greetings tot he old settlers, through Professor Findlay, president of the Historical Society, reached there in time and that the day was fine and all the old settlers living could be present and enjoy it themselves. They certainly deserve it after their long years of privations and hard work.

We h ad a long sea trip of seven  hours crossing over form Queensborough to Flushin, Holland. The sea was very rough and many were very sick. John enjoyed the canals and dykes and and windmills of picturesque Holland. We have been very fortunate as to weather, bright and cool, not one entire disagreeable day since we landed. John often says at eventide, “My, but this has been a grand day to me.” We are book to sail in the Hamburgh (sic) American steamer, The Kaiserine Augusta Victoria, a sister boat to the Amerika, and which sails on Oct. 2nd. When we went up to the steamer offices, we were obliged to answer a number of questions as to occupation, sex, color, etc., etc. When John heard me say white, he remarked: “Put me down green.”

I was very sorry to read of Senator Allison’s death. It seemed very pathetic and too bad that his last days should be embittered by strife in his own state, after so long a service to the public. He died on Tuesday and Thursday morning I was reading about his death in Edinburgh, Scotland. The wireless makes the world seem small.

Mary A. Duncombe