Archive for the ‘Holidays’ Category

5
Jul

Glorious Fourth Passed Quietly

   Posted by: admin Tags: , ,

The Fort Dodge Chronicle: July 5, 1907

Glorious Fourth Passed Quietly

Majority of Fort Dodge Citizens Spent Day in Cooling Shade of Nearby Woods

The glorious Fourth passed off very quietly in Fort Dodge, and during the afternoon there were fewer people to be seen on the streets than on a Sunday. During the morning hours there was considerable celebrating, but by noon the greater number of the people had sought the cooling shade of the nearby woods.

The majority of the people who left the city celebrated the day at Manson and Lehigh, both receiving large delegations, all of whom report a very pleasant time. No accidents incident to the day occurred in any of the towns in this section of the state. The banks of the Des Moines and the Lizard were well lined with fishermen, although the water was exceedingly muddy as a result of the heavy rain the night preceding.

All of the merchants in the city except the druggists, cigar dealers and news dealers closed their places all day long, the dealers in ice cream were entirely sold out of the commodity before night. All in all the day was passed very quietly and pleasantly by the people of this city, there being not even the usual minor accidents reported to mar the pleasures of the day, barring the sad drowning of Carl Intermill during the early part of the morning.

4
Jul

German Lutheran Picnic Enjoyable

   Posted by: admin Tags: ,

The Fort Dodge Chronicle: July 5, 1907

(Editor’s note: The newspapers did not publish on holidays or Sundays during the early days of Fort Dodge, so we must use a July 5 article to show what happened on July 4.)

German Lutheran Picnic Enjoyable

The German Lutheran annual picnic at Oleson park the Fourth was one of the largest attended and most successful in the past few years. There was amusement for everybody and all day long games, races, contest and other features were indulged in. Clerks at the refreshment stands were occupied every minute waiting upon the people. A picnic dinner was served at noon, the members of the church bringing lunch baskets well filled with good things to eat. It was an enjoyable event for many and one long remembered.

4
Jul

Successful Picnic Held The Fourth

   Posted by: admin Tags: ,

The Fort Dodge Chronicle: July 5, 1907

(Editor’s note: The newspapers did not publish on holidays or Sundays during the early days of Fort Dodge, so we must use a July 5 article to show what happened on July 4.)

Successful Picnic Held The Fourth

The members of the German Evangelical Sunday school and church held the most successful picnic of years in the woods north of the city Thursday. The fun started early and at the noon hour all enjoyed a grand picnic dinner. In the afternoon games and races of all kinds were enjoyed by both old and young. Everybody present voted it the best picnic held by the church for years. The attendance was large and all present entered into the spirit of the occasion. The success financially exceeded the expectations of all and the society was enriched to the amount of about ninety dollars (about $2,079 today).

30
May

Decoration Day 1878

   Posted by: admin Tags:

The Gazette and Messenger: May 24, 1878

(Editor’s note: The Gazette and Messenger didn’t print on Memorial Day.)

Decoration Day

This day which, as much as any other should be fitly observed, comes about next Thursday. No action toward a general celebration of the day has yet been taken though it needs only a little effort in the way of organization to make the day a grand success. The “Daughters of Rebecca” – bless them, were the first to speak and voted that they should celebrate whether any one else did or not. The Odd Fellows at their lodge meeting this week decided to turn out as a boyd. The guards will probably do likewise. All that is necessary is to have some system and organization about it and all will go off smoothly. A meeting should be called and committees appointed.

15
Feb

Some People

   Posted by: admin Tags:

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Feb. 15, 1907

Some People

Sent those funny (?) but vulgar valentines Thursday.

Anticipate a big building boom in Fort Dodge this year.

Believe the Grundhog (sic) a bum weather prophet.

Think two cents a mile rides will be pretty fine.

Take lots of care of themselves but are not as healthy as the careless.

Read every line of the Thaw trial before they eat, then tell how rank they think it all is.

Keep their children at home after 9 p.m. and some do not.

Can’t see how little time the public has for croakers and calamity howlers.

15
Feb

Town Topics

   Posted by: admin Tags:

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Feb. 15, 1907

Town Topics

Said one valentine dealer: “The tendency this year was more marked than ever in favor of artistic valentines. The coarse penny valentine is losing ground, and on the other hand the very elaborate, high priced, satin trimmed valentine is not so popular as it was. The prices of the popular valentines today range from one cent (23 cents today) to 75 cents ($17.32). When a young man feels like spending more than that on the object of his affection he will usually send candy or flowers, not a valentine costing as much as $10 ($231) or $15 ($346), which will be looked at once and then put aside.

Valentine postcards are among the latest innovations in connection with the observance of St. Valentine’s Day. To the man whose sentiments have been mildly stirred by Cupid the valentine postcard is a blessing. Without going to the trouble of placing it in a separate wrapper he may mail it to the object of his affection by simply affixing a one cent cent (sic) stamp. Each card is inscribed with some expression supposed to emanate from the heart and ranging in length from a single word to several lines of verse.

Another new thing is the valentine toast. These valentines constitute a series of well known and popular toasts neatly printed on a large card in colrs and suitably illustrated in colors. Such cards are intended for framing, and each is accompanied by a separate smaller card bearing such an inscription as “Valentine greetings” or “To my valentine,” etc.

The ragtime valentine is one of the new comers which is taking the place of the cheap comic. There is nothing vulgar in its laughable makeup. In this valentine grotesque figures are cut out and pasted on a heavy card. Each of the figures is neatly colored and made up with real cloth ties, cloth coats and cloth dresses. A feature of the ragtime valentine which commends it to purchasers is that it comes in a mailing case.

Other new comics include valentine jumping jacks, which are popular with the children. By pulling a strong these grotesque figures are made to go through all sorts of antics. There is a new series of valentines, styled “tender reflections,” in which a little mirror is fastened into the card. There is a series styled “on love’s highway,” in which love is depicted in every kind of vehicle, from a horsecar up to a 40-horsepower automobile.

1
Jan

Old Year Ended in a Pandemonium

   Posted by: admin Tags: ,

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Jan. 1, 1903

Old Year Ended in a Pandemonium

Ringing of Bells and Blowing of Whistles Marked the Entrance of 1903

A Beautiful New Years Day

Holiday Was Quietly Observed in Fort Dodge. Many Skating Parties This Afternoon.

Every whistle and every bell in Fort Dodge tooted or rang a welcome to the Glad New Year exactly on the stroke of twelve on Wednesday night. Pandemonium resulted and the discharge of numerous shot guns, six shooters and other weapons of warfare added to the general jubilee untill (sic) it was better than the Fourth of July.

People who, contrary to tradition had gone to sleep without watching the old year out, were aroused from their slumbers in a hurry and were made to realize that an important event was happening.

Fort Dodge was favored with a beautiful New Years day. The sun greeted 1903 with a broad smile of approval, and the weather was ideal in every respect. Many merry parties took advantage of the holiday to try the ice, which was alive with skaters all the afternoon, and the good old custom of making New Years calls was indulged in by many.

Business houses were closed quite generally for at least a part of the day and the services at the Catholic church were largely attended.

27
Dec

Christmas and Its Usual Results

   Posted by: admin Tags: ,

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 27, 1904

Christmas and Its Usual Results

It Was The Same Old Day in The Same Old Way and Greatly Enjoyed.

The Weather Was Very Mild

Skating Was Find And The Ice Was Black With Lovers of the Exhilarating Pastime – Everyone is Very Happy.

Christmas this year in Fort Dodge has passed with the usual gift giving, turkey eating, and sick getting.

Christmas eve saw the same crowds in the same stores, thronging the same toy counters and buying the same fuzzy animals and the same old discussion went on as to what to give to who.

As usual, children hung up their stockings and twisted and turned with excitement until they fell asleep hearing indistinct and mysterious rustling of tissue paper, and stealthy moving about in the rooms below.

There have been the same Christmas trees, the same presents, the same candies – alas – and the same doctors calls in the next day but who would give up all this sameness, for anything in the world?

It is the anticipation of children from one years end to another, and since it is more blessed to give than to receive the older people are immeasurably happy.

It is the time when every heart is softened in some measures and joy and good will and love reign supreme and no matter how dire may be results to all who are foolish – as all are at Christmas dinners – the spirit of the season has revealed hearts that are seared at all other seasons and worn bodies and aching brains find sweet relief in giver as well as gift, for “gift without the giver is bare.”

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Dec. 26, 1906

Santa Claus Held Sway

Yesterday Given Up to The Observance of Christmas Day.

Good old Saint Nick, the knight of the sock, the reindeer and the big pack, reigned supreme yesterday and received his full share of homage in Fort Dodge. The day was given up to Christmas rejoicing, merrymaking, feasting and holiday celebrations all over the city.

Business was suspended, except such as had to be carried on through necessity, all over the city when the stores closed Monday night after the busiest day of the year 1906.

The Christmas sun rose radiant and the day continued throughout one of the most beautiful for the time of year that could have been wished for. Christmas gatherings, family reunions and church programs formed the main events of the day. The happenings are chronicled in part below:

At St. Mark’s.

One of the prettiest trees on Christmas eve was that of St. Mark’s Sunday school. Prior to the distribution of the gifts a program of recitations was given by Misses Grace Chantland, Ellen Clark, Elizabeth Wheeler, Martha Fransen, Evelyn Roper, Myrtle Drake and Katahrinee (sic) Francis. In spite of the fact that regular church is not being held the Sunday school has been suprintended (sic) very ably by Mr. Frank Griffith and the school teachers.

Dolliver’s Family Reunion.

At the Senator Dolliver home a family re-union was indulged in. Miss Gay Dolliver of Sioux City was present to enjoy the festivities of the day. “Uncle Vic” rigged himself up in fur coat and flowing beard to impersonate “Saint Nick” and succeeded in scaring a year’s growth out of the baby, George Prentiss Dolliver, and so confused Francis and Margaret that they were not sure of their bearings. They exhibited the same symptoms that a (shy?) colt does the first time he meets a steam roller and it took considerable assurance from the older heads before they could be brought to think that the impersonator was not a wild man who had invaded the home for the purpose of committing some terrible deed. After the youngsters had been quieted the program was carried on with merriment and the occasion made one that will linger long in the minds of those who were present to participate. The genial “Vic” succeeded in carrying out his part without destroying his borrowed plumage by fire or enacting any of the tragedies incident to the occasion. The younger member of the household has recovered from his scare but still retains an aversion to anything with long shaggy whiskers that speaks in muffled tones.

A Christmas Tree Fire.

A Christmas tree at the J.W. Amond home Christmas eve caused quite a little excitement by catching fire. No serious damage was done although the carpet was burned and Mr. Amond received a slight injury to his hand.

Remembered The Employes.

Among the most generous and most appreciated Christmas gifts were those received by the clerks of the Sturges company from their employer, Mr. L.E. Sturges. The gifts consisted of sums of money which were presented with the compliments of the season on Christmas eve.

Methodist Christmas Eve.

The surprise program of the Methodist Sunday School was one of hte most interesting and novel Christmas eve celebrations in the local churches. The church was decorated with two trees and festooned evergreen and strings of colored lights. In the centre (sic) of the choir loft was suspended a large star.

Nine classes took part in the evening’s celebration. Superintendent Dr. Money called upon each one in turn to give some literary or musical feature. Here are the classes:

Senior Bible Class – Scripture reading.
J.F. Nelson’s class – Piano solo, Miss Myrtle Parsons.
J.G. Early’s class – Album characters.
Miss Martin’s and Miss Houk’s classes in primary department – Sixty children in motion song.
Young men’s class, Mrs. J.G. Early, instructor – Cornet solo. Harry Sultzbaugh.
Miss Ruth Cummings’ class – Duet, Misses Sauerbrunn and Gregg.
Mrs. J.F. Monk’s class of boys – Recitation and chorus song.
James Sultzbaugh’s class of girls – Recitation – Miss Corenlia (sic) McBurney.
Miss Jeanette Early’s and Miss Phoebe Sultzbaugh’s classes – Chorus of 30 little girls.

The favorite number on the program was the album given by the young men and women of Mr. Early’s class. Here were shown pictures of members of the Early faily (sic – family?) in early days.

West Side M.E.

A Christmas program was held by the Sunday school classes of the West Side M.E. church Tuesday evening. A large crowd was present. A beautiful Christmas tree which held a gift for everyone present, and a fine program constituted the entertainment of the evening.

Railroad Offices Closed.

Yesterday there was not a railroad office in the city, with the exception of the Illinois Central dispatcher’s office, open. The railroad men one and all were making merry. On the Great Western freights 85 and 86 and the stucco special were annulled. On the M. and (S)t. L. the wayfreights were pulled off for the day. Business on the Illinois Central did not stop because of the holiday. The switch engines were busy in the yards all day and the traffic was as large as on any other day.

At Corpus Christi and Sacred Heart Catholic churches three morning masses were said. The first ones were at five and six thirty o’clock. They ended with the usual high mass at ten thirty. Sermons appropriate to the occasion were preached by the pastors.

Bring Back Gifts.

In almost every store along the street people can be seen today bringing back gifts to exchange them for a different design or size. Especially where the articles are gifts of clothing and a misfit resulted, is this to be noticed.

Merchants Invoice.

Now that the busy Christmas season has practically closed, many of the merchants along the streets are beginning to take their yearly invoice and perparing (sic) for straightening accounts, which always comes at the close of the year.

25
Dec

A Gladsome Christmas

   Posted by: admin Tags:

Christmas postcard

If I had but the power
To make my words come True
I wish you all things bright and gay
And give them all to you.