Archive for the ‘Stanhope’ Category


Gets a Wife Through an “Ad”

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 22, 1905

Gets a Wife Through an “Ad”

Iowa Man Chooses a Unique Method of Securing a Helpmeet

Webster City, Ia. Aug. 22 — Bert Owen, a young machinist from Valley Junction, has been in Webster City for several days in search of a wife. He advertised in the want ad column of one of the state papers for a helpmeet and a Hamilton county girl answered the advertisement. Owen returned home this morning in a very happy frame of mind and announced to close friends here that the wedding would take place during the week of the state fair.

Just who the fair damsel is is still something of a secret. Owen announced that her home is in Stanhope, but that she is visiting relatives in Webster City, and that she answered his advertisement form this city. Owen refused to disclose her name, but talked freely of his brief but successful romance.

He came to the city several days ago registered at the Wilson hotel and sought out the lady who had answered the advertisement. “She had sent me her photo,” said he at the depot this morning, “and I liked her looks. But say, she’s a whole lot better looking than the picture and I’m just sure we will like each other.”

Owen is quite talkative. Upon his arrival here he visited several stores in the city and sought information from the clerks as to the woman who had answer (sic) his advertisement. He was not at all backward and confided to all that she had answered his matrimonial advertisement and that he had come to the city to look her up. Since she is from Stanhope, south of the city, not many knew her. Owen, however, was not disheartened by this and apparently the investigations he carried on were satisfactory to him for the brief acquaintance of only a few days will culminate at the marriage altar.


Black Diptheria at Stanhope

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 13, 1904

Black Diphtheria at Stanhope

Dread Disease Made its Appearance There Some Time Ago

Many People Were Exposed

Malady Was at First Pronounced Tonsillitis and Many People Visited the Afflicted Homes, Exposing Themselves to the Disease

The town of Stanhope, a few miles south of Webster City, is in a high state of terrified anxiety over the appearance of several cases of black diphtheria, from which three deaths have already resulted. It is reported new cases are breaking out with terrible regularity and that many exposures have occurred thruout (sic) the town.

Every effort is now being made by the terrified citizens to put a stop to the spread of the malady, and it is hoped that from now on there will be no more eposures (sic). The disease is stated to be the most malignant type of that most dreaded of all the ills of childhood, black diphtheria.

The malady has not attacked children exclusively, but in one or two instances grown people have been infected.

Reports from the Leonard Hill home today indicates that Mr. Hill who is suffering from the disease, is no worse but appears to be holding his own. Little Mildred, who was buried Sunday last was the last of the Hill children, which fact makes the case particularly sad and elicits the sympathy of all.

It is feared that unless the officials in Stratford and Stanhope exercise the strictest quarantine and care in families who have the disease or have been exposed to it, that it will spread rapidly. It appears that when the disease first made its appearance in the Leonard Hill family it was pronounced tonsilitis (sic). Neighbors and other friends went in and out of the home in a very free manner. Of course all these have been exposed to the black diphtheria and if the authorities are to protect the people from an epidemic of diphtheria all persons who have been exposed should be promptly put under quarantine and kep there until it develops whether or not they have the disease. Black diphtheria is not a disease to be trifled with and the health of the community demands that all quarantine laws be strictly enforced regardless of how many or how prominent the people who may have been exposed to it.

Besides the little Chipman girl the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milburn is also suffering with the disease.