Posts Tagged ‘Rankin’


Improvements in Fire Department

   Posted by: admin    in City Council, fire department

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 4, 1904

Improvements in Fire Department

Shall Another Station Be Built and New Wagon Ordered?

Present System Inadequate

Says Fire Marshal Lowry Who Advocated Purchase of Chemical Wagon and New Station. Fire Committee Discusses Matter

Does Fort Dodge Need a new fire house, locate presumably on the corner of Twelfth street and First avenue north, and a new wagon which will be fitted up for the extinguishing of fires by chemicals? These are two momentous questions which will be discussed by the city council at their next regular meeting Monday night.

Need of Chemical Wagon

In the opinion of Fire Marshal Lowry, the present fire protection is inadequate to the needs of the city. Over sixty per cent of the fires could be put out by chemicals, thus saving the loss of damage to property by water. But the present wagon is fitted out with only two two gallon extinguishers. At a meeting of the fire committee held last night the matter was taken under advisement and a recommendation will be made to the city council next Monday to purchase a new chemical wagon. Such a wagon would be about the size of the present wagon, but would contain a forty gallon tank of chemicals under the seat with two smaller tanks on each side of the wagon. Two hundred feet of chemical hose would be included and a root and extension ladders. 1,000 feet of water hose will also be carried. the cost of such a wagon complete would not exceed $1,700 (about $42,775 today). It would weigh 8,000 pounds when empty and would be equipped with three-inch rubber tires. This wagon would serve as a protection to districts outside of the city mains, the chemicals being as effective one place as another.

The present wagon would by no means go out of use. It could be kept in the present house and the old hook and ladder which is now stored in the fire house and which is very seldom used, could be taken elsewhere. In case of large fires a hack team could be secured and both wagons used, but as chemicals are used in the main, the new wagon would be taken out for the most part. (Editor’s note: They are suggesting that in case of a large fire, someone would run to a livery stable and hire horses to run the old hook and ladder. Times have certainly changed.)

Need of Second Department

It is also the intention to bring up the matter of having a second station. It is argued that should two fires happen to take place at the same time in opposite parts of the city protection could not be offered. The present East End department consists of but a hose car and relies entirely on volunteers in case of fire. It is thought that a station located on the city’s property on the corner of Twelfth street and First avenue would be in the proper place. This location would make it almost the central part of the city and at the same time save the lower department of the run up hill to the east part of the city which is always so exasperating. A second station could be maintained with very little cost after the building had once been built, as there would be plenty of apparatus when the new wagon had been purchased.

Waterloo Has Two Wagons

Those of the department in favor of the improvement say that inasmuch as other towns of size not larger than this, hav1e superior protection to that in Fort Dodge, a change for the better should be made. Waterloo has two chemical wagons. The water committee is composed of John Ruge, Guy Ranking, Jesse Beal, and Louis Fessler.

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Important Writ of Injunction

   Posted by: admin    in Baseball, Entertainment

The Fort Dodge Messenger: May 8, 1903

Important Writ of Injunction

Happiness of Harry Holm for the Summer Has Been Dealt Crushing Blow

Faces a Dire Predicament

Has Been Enjoined From Occupying His Favorite Seat in Grand Stand

Harry Holm has been enjoined. Never again may he occupy his favorite perch in the grand stand at Riverside park, just where he can watch the balls curve over the home plate and tell whether or not the  umpire is right or wrong. The injunction has been served upon its hapless victim and unless he can break it, he will have to go and sit in the bleachers, for never again can he be happy in the grand stand, save in  his old accustomed place.

The full extent and purport of this malignant document, which has been gotten out by J.F. Ford, J.C. Walburger and G.F. Rankin as plaintiffs, is shown by the following literal translation:

“To the said defendant: You are hereby notified that on or before the 14th day of August, A.D., 1903, there will be on file in the district court of Webster county, Iowa, the petition of the plaintiffs, aforesaid, enjoining you from occupying the seat in the grand stand at Riverside park in Fort Dodge, Iowa, the seat referred to being more fully described as being located directly back of the home plate in Riverside ball park and fourth row from the ground, and you are farther notified not to occupy or attempt to occupy the third or fifth row, and that you are h ereby relegated to the rear to make room for real fans.”

Healy Bros. & Kelleher appear as attorneys for the plaintiff. Harry has not yet retained an attorney. He is thinking over a plan of resting his case with the ladies of Fort Dodge. Before this gentle tribunal he feels sure that so harsh and unjust a measure as this will not be for an instant countenanced.

The clause about his not being a real fan also rankles in Harry’s memory. “I’ll show ’em,” he remarked. “If they won’t let me sit in the grand stand where I want to, I’ll go into the bleachers or climb a telegraph pole, but they won’t keep me from seeing if I have to use a balloon.”

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Would Return The “Cardiff Giant”

   Posted by: admin    in Entertainment

The Fort Dodge Messenger: Aug. 19, 1903

Would Return The “Cardiff Giant”

Suggestion to That Effect is Made by G.F. Rankin – May Take Up Matter.

Place Image in the Park

The Famous International Hoax, Now in a Barn in Boston, Could be Purchased and Brought to Fort Dodge – Would Attract Attention.

Why not return the Cardiff giant to Fort Dodge?

The famous giant, the story of whom is entwined with that of the early history of Fort Dodge, has been absent from this vicinity for thirty-five years. His present resting place is in a barn in Boston.

G.F. Rankin is the originator of the scheme to return the Cardiff Giant to Fort Dodge. In speaking of the matter Mr. Rankin said today that he will head the list with $5 for the purpose of subscribing an amount necessary to buy the stone man and return him to this city. The giant is now resting in a barn in the city of Boston where he has been deserted and nearly forgotten. It is Mr. Rankin’s plan to buy the image form its present owner, convey it to Fort Dodge and here set it up in the city park together with a brief sketch of its history.

Much has been written and said about the world renowned fake since it was discovered near Cardiff, New York, nearly thirty-five years ago. According to the many stories told of the giant it was in 1868 that Hull and Black came to Fort Dodge and quarried an immense piece of gypsum for the purpose, they said, of making it Iowa’s contribution to the Washington monument. The stone it is known was dug up in Gypsum Hollow, carted to Boone and on a flat car taken from that place to Chicago and finally east. After much labor and pains it was carved until it assumed the likeness of the petrified remains of an immense man. The stone was buried near Cardiff, New York, in the fall and dug up the following spring, when the money-making reign of its discovers (sic) begun. It was finally declared and proven a hoax by Professor Marsh of Yale.

Because of the fact that the Cardiff giant had his origin in Fort Dodge, and also in view of hte fact that the fake has been seen by a comparatively few, should the stone man be returned to this city and set up in a public place he would be of interest, not alone to the city, but to everyone.

The matter of buying the giant may be taken up and a subscription list for that purpose started.

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First Official Trip is Made

   Posted by: admin    in Interurban

The Fort Dodge Messenger: June 22, 1903

First Official Trip is Made

Car No. 20, of Fort Dodge and Interurban Line, Makes Run Over New Extension.

Was Enjoyable Excursion

Thirty-Two Fort Dodge People Were Guests of the Street Car Management – Run Was Made to Race Track, Terminal Line.

The first official trip over the Fort Dodge and Interurban street car line was made Saturday evening at 7:30. The excursion was made in one of the new cars, No. 20. Manager Healy had invited about thirty friends, including the stockholders of the company to ride as guests of honor upon the occasion of the first tour over the new line.

No. 20 is a large, easy running car, and as the road bed is in good condition the trip was a very enjoyable one. The party left at the city park and rode directly to the new park where the guests alighted and were shown about the grounds. After viewing the park, the car was run out to the driving park which is the terminal of the line, after which the party was conveyed back to the city.

The trip was made without a hitch and the management received many congratulations upon the successful and early completion of the line. Manager Healy had charge of the trip; Arthur Comstock, superintendent of the Light & Power company was the motor man, and Thomas Wilson acted s conductor on the first run.

There are now four miles of track laid which makes the ride a pleasure trip as well as convenient for those living on the line. For the present two cars will be kept running on the line. The cars will pass at the Great Western depot. The management are now arranging a schedule.

Those who went out on the first trip were:

Ed Haire
J.J. Ryan
E.G. Larson
B.J. Price
H.A. Cook
J.E. Downing
Andrew Hower
W.I. Selvy
Frank Collins
Marshall Young
Will Laufersweiler
Louis Fessler
Harry Harps
M.J. Haire
M.J. Rodney
Jack Ruge
Robert Healy
Maurice Welch
G.F. Rankin
Will Healy
John Wolfinger
John Vaughn
Ed Welch
Tom Joyce
C.B. Hepler
John Campbell
O.M. Oleson
C.A. Roberts
George Flannigan
P.J. Tierney
B.W. Slack
Earl Robinson

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Coalville Man Wins Automobile

   Posted by: admin    in Automobile, Coalville, Merchants

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 5, 1904

Coalville Man Wins Automobile

Oscar Hult, a Young Man Employed in Coal Mines, has Lucky Number

Winning  Number is 30,358

Automobile Proves Popular, and No Dissatisfaction With Result.

One day last summer, Oscar Hult, a coal miner in the employ of the Gleason Coal company at Coalville, went into the Plymouth Clothing house and bought a suit of clothes. When the clerk wrapped them up he gave Mr. Hult ten tickets on the automobile, which was raffled off last Wednesday evening. During the last year different persons within a radius of fifty miles have bought clothing in Fort Dodge at the Plymouth because they wanted to get a ticket on the automobile. When the doors were opened Wednesday evening at 8 o’clock there was a large crowd waiting outside. The weather was fierce. Sweeping blasts from the northwest caused men to pull their coat collars a little  higher, but it did not deter them from being present and on time. It only required a short time to fill the store although special provisions had been made for the reception. The tables laden with clothing had been pushed pack and a temporary stage made in the center of the room On it the committee consisting of Will Cisne, R.E. Sherman, J.E. Downing, John Ruge, G.F. Rankin, Chas H. Colby and E.G. Healy, began the work of finding the lucky number. The tickets were placed in a large revolving church and after a thorough mixing one was drawn out. When it was read, there was a dead silence. There were no cries of “I have it.” Then twenty-nine others were drawn and called out to be used in case the first one did not come to light.

When the train from Coalville pulled into the station at noon today there was a large number of men and boys who alighted and made straight for the Plymouth. Oscar Hult only touched the ground a few times on his way down town. He had the lucky number clutched tightly in his hand and wore a smile that would not come off when he made known the fact at the Plymouth. His friends and associates shared in the joy with him. He concluded to leave his property where it is for the present, but expects to dispose of it in a short time. The drawing has been a great success as well as a great advertisement for the Plymouth. All those who held tickets were perfectly satisfied with the manner in which the raffle has been conducted. Mr. Hult is to be congratulated.

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