Archive for March 31st, 2011

31
Mar

Dread Smallpox Appears Near Vincent

   Posted by: admin    in Disease, People, Quarantine

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 31, 1903

Dread Smallpox Appears Near Vincent

John Simon and Family, Five in All, Have Been Closely Quarantined.

Vincent, March 31 – Vincent people are greatly agitated over the breaking out of two genuine small pox cases at the John Simon Home one half mile south and three miles east of that place.

Mr. and Mrs. Simon and son Joseph and daughter Edith and Stora have all broken out with the malady. The place has been quarantined, but many of the neighbors and some Vincent people are said to have visited at the Simon place before it was discovered that the Simons were stricken with the dreaded disease. As practically all Vincent people have been vaccinated many cases of the genuine smallpox cannot break out.

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31
Mar

Is There Firebug in Harcourt?

   Posted by: admin    in Fire, Harcourt, People

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 31, 1903

Is There Firebug in Harcourt?

Events of Past Few Days Cause Strong Suspicion

Three Fires in Same Place.

Harcourt Citizens Kept Busy Fighting Fire in Haggin Drug Store – A Period of Excitement.

Harcourt, March 31 – Harcourt has this week had a narrow escape from a disastrous fire which has awakened much excitement among the citizens of this town. Last Wednesday morning about 7 o’clock the fire was discovered at the drug store. With the aid of as many citizens as could be mustered and the appliances which the town possesses the fire was quickly subdued without any damage to property.

About 10 o’clock the same day the cry was again raised, “Fire at the drug store,” and by the time sufficient aid arrived the whole building, including the restaurant building now occupied by L. Haggin and family for living room was filled with a dense smoke. About fifty men arrived at the scene, some of them fighting the fire and the rest removing the furniture from the rooms. The most valuable portion of the drug stock was also removed.

though the whole building seemed on fire, yet the citizens by heroic exertions again saved it and the fire was supposed to be out but the next morning at 3 o’clock the fire alarm was again called and the fire again put out.

How the fire started in a mystery and considerable talk of incendiarism is beaing (sic) heard, altho no cause or reason can be assigned for such a supposition. The building, a double one, two stories high, is owned by W.J. Struthers and J.E. Swanburg, Mr. Haggin, the druggist leasing the building. The furniture and drug stock are badly damaged from the effect of fighting the fire.

Had the building burned down, there is no doubt that the meat market owned by A.A. Peterson and the Wilson Brothers store would have shared the same fate as they adjoin it.

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31
Mar

Rockwell Young Man Elopes With School Girl

   Posted by: admin    in People, Rockwell

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 31, 1903

Rockwell Young Man Elopes With School Girl

Young People Take Their Romance in Their Own Hands and Leave Town Together.

Rockwell, Iowa, March 31 – Rockwell is experiencing a decided sensation in the elopement of two of her young people: Miss Zell Smith and Guy Davis. Miss Smith is an unusually prepossessing young lady not quite 18 years of age, and has been attending the public school here this winter and rooming in the second floor of the Mallory block. she is an only daughter of Mr. and Mrs Isaiah Smith, well-to-do people living six miles northeast of Rockwell and who, it seems objected to the attentions of young Davis.

The  young couple boarded the 8:20 train north Wednesday evening and nothing has been seen or heard of them since. The continued absence of Miss Smith from school aroused suspicion and yesterday noon friends broke into her room and discovered a note addressed to her parents telling them of the step she was about to take and begging forgiveness for the sorrow and heartache she would cause them.

The young lady’s father was immediately notified, but he is completely at sea as to her whereabouts. Mr. Davis is a son of respected parents living in the country a short distance from town.

Professor Mahannah is grieved at the occurrence, as Miss Smith was one of the brightest pupils in the whole school. People generally regard the affair as unfortunate and regret that the young people had not acted with less rashness.

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: April 3, 1903

Takes Runaway Couple Home

Stern Father Locates Daughter, a 17-year-old Bride of Six Days

Ran Away From School to Wed

Isaih F. Smith, of Rockwell, Says he will See What Virtue There is in the Law

Marshalltown, April 3 – The curtain was drawn in this city Wednesday afternoon on a little domestic tragedy, which had its beginning a week ago when Ivan Guy Davis, a 19-year old boy living near Rockwell, eloped with pretty Lola Zelle Smith, aged 17, a student in the Rockwell high school, from which she was to graduate next June. The couple was married at St. Anthony, Friday, March 27, by Mayor Samuel Meekins.

Isiah F. Smith, a well-to-do farmer living six miles northeast of Rockwell, in Bath township, who is about to retire from the farm and move to Mason City to reside is the father of the bride.

Miss Smith was in school at Rockwell and on Wednesday, March 25, obtained an excuse from the principal on the grounds of  illness. The illness was caused from the bacilli of love, a fresh culture of which had found fertile ground in the heart of her affections. Ivan Guy Davis, aged 19, son of S.R. Davis, formerly a farmer living three miles north of Zearing, but now living near Rockwell.

The young people didn’t ask either Papa and Mamma Smith, or Papa and Mamma Davis, but took French leave, going to Mason City. At that place they boarded the fast night train of the Iowa Central, No. 6 coming to this city. On Friday they obtained a license at the office of Clerk of Courts Knisely, Ralph Le Fever of St. Anthony, minor son of A.D. LeFever, a farmer living about midway between St. Anthony and Zearing, acting as sponsor and searing to the affidavit in which the legal ages of the young people was the most important.

The happy pair, congratulating themselves on their capability of outwitting the old folds, took the Story Branch train in the evening for St. Anthony, where Mayor Meekins was induced to tie the nuptial knot.

At the Rockwell end of the line the scene was not so happy. Mr. Smith was about two days late, but when he found that his daughter had left school he was pretty sure what had happened. He also found that young Davis was not at home and at once began the search. He came to this city and consulted the marriage record and a few little notations under the “D’s” told him all he wanted to know.

He went to Zearing Wednesday morning, with the idea of tearing the bride from her young husband. Davis refused to be torn and accompanied his wife and her father to Rockwell Wednesday evening.

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31
Mar

Moving Time in Frogland

   Posted by: admin    in Animals

The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 31, 1905

Moving Time in Frogland

Thousands Swarm Streets

Resident of West Fort Dodge Tells a Story of Their Trip Up The Hill and Across The Tracks – Move Means Fishing is Good at This Time.

For the past few nights the migration of the frogs from the river to the higher grounds on the tops of the hills has been taking place, and it is one of the most peculiar sights that has been seen in Fort Dodge for a long time. The frogs seem to do all of their moving in the night, and after nine o’clock the streets down toward the river have been swarming with the hop toads on the move.

A resident of West Fort Dodge who has witnessed the sight on two or three nights, states that there were hundreds of the little fellows, and that they fairly swarmed over the sidewalks, so that it was hard to walk without stepping on them at times. On his way toward the bridge he notices the first one at the top of the hill just above the tracks. This one hopped off the walk in front of him, and taking a few steps more there were several others jumping past him. As he got down to the tracks, they were swarming on every side, and hundreds of them were encountered from there on down to the river.

There was no mistaking the way they were traveling, as they were all headed toward the top of the hill and were going right along as though they had a definite idea as to their destination.

Other people report that while the emigration of frogs was gong on here, the same thing was happening farther  up the river and that they were swarming up the hill toward Round Prairie in the same manner. It is probably that the movement was general and that they were making for the ponds, sloughs and creeks farther back on the hills.

While this movement has never been remarked in Fort Dodge, it is said to be no very uncommon thing, and that when the frogs leave the river in this manner, they are fleeing for their lives from the fish, which denotes that the fishing is good. However, owing to strict enforcement of the game laws, the fact that the fishing is good will not do much toward making local fishermen happy.

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31
Mar

To Be Finished Within Month

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The Fort Dodge Messenger: March 31, 1903

To Be Finished Within Month

Fort Dodge’s Carnegie Library is Very Nearly Completed

Progress is Satisfactory.

E.C. Wakefield, superintendent of Construction, is Looking foward to Completion.

The new Carnegie library which has been in process of construction during the past two years, and which was to have been completed many months ago, will be ready for the occupancy of books in a month. Such is the opinion of E.C. Wakefield, who for a time had charge of its construction under the Northern Building Company which recently came to a disastrous end, and who is superintending its completion. Wakefield says that the marble and ornamental plaster work will be completed this week and that most of the library fixtures, such as the loop stacks – metal shelves for holding the books – are on hand and are ready for setting up.

Many causes have contributed to the delay in completion. The material was ordered when there was a great demand for all building material so that the company had to wait several months for the steel. A strike among the stone cutters also caused considerable delay and lastly the failure of the Northern Building company has tended to make the building as slow in completion as the Chicago postoffice.

Now that the material is all on hand and an energetic library committee shoving the work thru, the new Carnegie Library will soon be in a condition for patrons to admire its architectural beauty.

(Editor’s note: I’ll have to go back and do some research about the Northern Building Company, to find out why it “came to a disastrous end.”)

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